Studio Precht Designs A Fingerprint-Shaped Park For Physical Distancing • Discoverology

Studio Precht Designs A Fingerprint-Shaped Park For Physical Distancing

Austria-based studio Precht — previously known as Penda — has unveiled the design for a lush green park envisioned for physical distancing and short-term solitude. Dubbed Parc de la Distance, the open air space has been shaped in the form of a fingerprint, evoking human touch.

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