Stacked Straw Bales Form Walls For Conceptual School In Malawi By Nudes • Discoverology

Stacked Straw Bales Form Walls For Conceptual School In Malawi By Nudes

Architecture, Design

Indian architecture office Nudes has developed a concept for a secondary school in Malawi, with a modular wooden structure and curved walls made from straw bales. Nudes, led by architect Nuru Karim, created the concept for the Straw Bale School.

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