Seven Mysterious Sounds Science Has Yet To Solve • Discoverology

Seven Mysterious Sounds Science Has Yet To Solve

Science

Sounds of unknown origin can be more than unsettling; they can inspire decades of mythos and fear—and obsessive scientific inquiry. From jarring radio broadcasts to harmonious dunes, here are some of the world’s great sonic mysteries.

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