Selfishness Is Learned • Discoverology

Selfishness Is Learned

Psychology

Harvard professors, Martin Nowak and Joshua Greene, tackled a question: Which is our default mode, selfishness or selflessness? Do we all have craven instincts we must restrain by force of will? Or are we basically good, even if we slip up sometimes?

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