Best Science Articles & Videos on the internet • Discoverology

Science

Read the best science articles from around the internet, or watch the most insightful science videos from platforms like Youtube, Vimeo or leading science publishers like The Smithsonian, Quanta Magazine, New Scientist, Pacific Standard and many more.

Treasure Fever

Treasure Fever

Long Reads, Nature, Science

Cape Canaveral contains one of the greatest concentrations of colonial shipwrecks in the world. The discovery of a legendary, lost shipwreck in North America has pitted treasure hunters and archaeologists against each other, raising questions about who should control sunken riches.

What Makes A Person Charismatic?

What Makes A Person Charismatic?

Life, Psychology, Science

Why do some people so clearly have it and others don’t? Why do we fall so easily under its influence? Charismatics can make us feel charmed and great about ourselves. They can inspire us to excel. But they can also be dangerous. They use charisma for their own purposes, to enhance their power, to manipulate others.

The Rail Industry’s Secret, Decades-Long Fight Against The Climate

The Rail Industry’s Secret, Decades-Long Fight Against The Climate

Business, Nature, Science

For nearly 30 years, America’s four biggest rail companies—which move the majority of the country’s coal—have spent millions to deny climate science and block climate policy. They have joined or funded groups that attacked individual scientists and rejected reports from major scientific institutions.

Defeated Chess Champ Garry Kasparov Has Made Peace With AI

Defeated Chess Champ Garry Kasparov Has Made Peace With AI

Science, Tech

For almost two decades after becoming world champion in 1985, Garry Kasparov dominated the game with a ferocious style of play and an equally ferocious swagger. In 1997, at the height of his powers, Kasparov was crushed and cowed by an IBM supercomputer called Deep Blue.

Are There Bacteria In Your Brain?

Are There Bacteria In Your Brain?

Science

The brain is protected from the bacterial menagerie of the body by the blood-brain barrier, and is considered a sterile organ. Which made it all the more surprising when Rosalinda Roberts, along with Charlene Farmer and Courtney Walker, realized that the unknown objects in their slides were bacteria.

Tony Menias

Inspiration
Tony Menias
How To Keep The Earth As Inhabitable As Possible

How To Keep The Earth As Inhabitable As Possible

Nature, Science

We’ve been behind where we need to be for decades now, and the fact that we’ll be living in a hotter, less hospitable world is an inevitability. The only uncertainty left is how quickly we respond and how much damage we’re going to be able to prevent.

Palantir’s Top-Secret User Manual For Cops

Palantir’s Top-Secret User Manual For Cops

Crime, Science, Tech

Palantir is one of the most significant and secretive companies in big data analysis. The company acts as an information management service for Immigrations and Customs Enforcement, corporations like JP Morgan and Airbus, and dozens of other local, state, and federal agencies.

How A Volcanic Eruption Helped Create Modern Scotland

How A Volcanic Eruption Helped Create Modern Scotland

History, Nature, Science

Over seven terrible years in the 1690s, crops failed, farming villages emptied, and severe famine killed up to 15% of the entire population of Scotland. Soon after, the formerly independent nation joined Great Britain. Now, researchers suggest volcanic eruptions thousands of kilometers away may have helped spark this political transformation.

The Real Reason The Sound Of Your Own Voice Makes You Cringe

The Real Reason The Sound Of Your Own Voice Makes You Cringe

Psychology, Science

A common explanation is that because we normally hear our own voice while talking, we receive both sound transferred to our ears externally by air conduction and sound transferred internally through our bones. This bone conduction of sound delivers rich low frequencies that are not included in air-conducted vocal sound.

Can You Die From A Broken Heart?

Can You Die From A Broken Heart?

Health, Science

The emotional devastation of losing a loved one can certainly feel like physical pain. But can you really die from a broken heart? As it turns out, you can, from “broken-heart syndrome,” also known as stress-induced cardiomyopathy.

How Much The Public Knows About Science, And Why It Matters

How Much The Public Knows About Science, And Why It Matters

Science

A survey finds striking differences in levels of science knowledge by education and by race and ethnicity. About half of whites (48 percent) score high; by comparison, much smaller shares of Hispanics (23 percent) and blacks (9 percent) correctly answer at least nine of the questions.

Natalie Foss

Inspiration
Natalie Foss
A Banana Grown At Subzero Temps Also Has An Edible Peel

A Banana Grown At Subzero Temps Also Has An Edible Peel

Food, Innovation, Nature, Science

A Japanese farm introduced a new crop this winter: an organic banana with a peel that’s thin enough to eat. In a nod to this appealing outer covering, Setsuzo Tanaka, the banana’s inventor, has named his creation the Mongee (“mon-gay”) banana — which means “incredible banana” in Japanese.

Radical Hydrogen-Boron Reactor Leapfrogs Current Nuclear Fusion Tech

Radical Hydrogen-Boron Reactor Leapfrogs Current Nuclear Fusion Tech

Innovation, Science

HB11 Energy is a spin-out company that originated at the University of New South Wales, and it announced today a swag of patents through Japan, China and the USA protecting its unique approach to fusion energy generation. Fusion, of course, is the long-awaited clean, safe theoretical solution to humanity’s energy needs.

Can One Earthquake Trigger Another On The Other Side Of The World?

Can One Earthquake Trigger Another On The Other Side Of The World?

Nature, Science, World

It’s well known that natural disasters can cause others in their immediate vicinity, for instance, hurricanes are often accompanied by flooding, and earthquakes are followed by aftershocks. But what about longer distance interactions? Could one earthquake trigger another on the other side of the world?

Does The Data We Produce Serve Us, Or Vice Versa?

Does The Data We Produce Serve Us, Or Vice Versa?

Health, Life, Science

Humans generate far more actionable information than is encoded in all of our combined genetic material, and we carry much of it into the future. The data outside of our biological selves—call it the dataome—could actually represent the grander scaffolding for complex life.

Is Our Brain Hard-Wired To Be Optimistic?

Is Our Brain Hard-Wired To Be Optimistic?

Psychology, Science

Psychologists have found that 80% of people have, what they define as an optimism bias and that’s regardless of whether they believe themselves to be more pessimistic or realistic. The optimism bias is our tendency to underestimate the likelihood of negative events and overestimating the likelihood of positive events.

Surprising Ways To Beat Anxiety And Become Mentally Strong – According To Science

Surprising Ways To Beat Anxiety And Become Mentally Strong – According To Science

Health, Psychology, Science

The way you cope or handle things in life has a direct impact on how much anxiety you experience – tweak the way you’re coping, therefore, and you can lower your anxiety levels. Research shows that if it’s left untreated, anxiety can lead to depression, early death and suicide.

Behind The Scenes Of A Radical New Cancer Cure

Behind The Scenes Of A Radical New Cancer Cure

Health, Long Reads, Science

CAR-T involves removing a patient’s own blood, filtering for immune cells called T-cells, and genetically engineering those cells to recognize and attack cancer. CAR-T made history in 2017 as the first FDA-approved gene therapy to treat any disease. The trials that led to approval showed response rates of 80 percent and above in aggressive leukemias and lymphomas that had resisted chemotherapy.

Astrid Rasmussen

Inspiration
Astrid Rasmussen
How Political Opinions Change

How Political Opinions Change

Explainers, Politics, Psychology, Science

A powerful shaping factor about our social and political worlds is how they are structured by group belonging and identities. For instance, researchers have found that moral and emotion messages on contentious political topics, such as gun-control and climate change, spread more rapidly within rather than between ideologically like-minded networks.

How I Rewired My Brain To Become Fluent In Math

How I Rewired My Brain To Become Fluent In Math

Psychology, Science

Having a basic, deep-seated fluency in math and science—not just an “understanding,” is critical. The “fluency” part of me that loved literature and language was also the same part of me that ultimately fell in love with math and science—and transformed and enriched my life.

The Internet Is Destroying Our Collective Attention Span

The Internet Is Destroying Our Collective Attention Span

Health, Science, Tech

The length of time our “collective attention” is on any given event has grown shorter, and topics become popular and then drop out of public view at an accelerating rate. It’s no surprise if it feels harder and harder to dwell deeply on any topic.

The Key To Good Luck Is An Open Mind

The Key To Good Luck Is An Open Mind

Life, Psychology, Science

What do these people have that the rest of us don’t? It turns out “ability” is the key word here. Beyond their level of privilege or the circumstances they were born into, the luckiest people may have a specific set of skills that bring chance opportunities their way.

The Rise Of Junk Science

The Rise Of Junk Science

Long Reads, Media, Science

Fake publications are corrupting the world of research—and influencing real news. At the most benign level of the junk industry are papers, published in journals with no effective screening process, that are obvious nonsense.

How A Volcano In Hawaii Became A Battleground For Astronomy

How A Volcano In Hawaii Became A Battleground For Astronomy

Long Reads, Science

Native Hawaiians are protecting the mountain of Maunakea, at the heart of Hawaii’s Big Island, from the construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) at its summit, where the facility would join venerable observatories like the twin Keck domes and NASA’s Infrared Telescope Facility.

Inside SpinLaunch, The Space Industry’s Best Kept Secret

Inside SpinLaunch, The Space Industry’s Best Kept Secret

Science, Tech

Last summer, a secretive space company took up residence in a massive warehouse in the sun-soaked industrial neighborhood that surrounds Long Beach Airport. The company is building a massive centrifuge to accelerate rockets and send them screaming into space.

Seven Mysterious Sounds Science Has Yet To Solve

Seven Mysterious Sounds Science Has Yet To Solve

Science

Sounds of unknown origin can be more than unsettling; they can inspire decades of mythos and fear—and obsessive scientific inquiry. From jarring radio broadcasts to harmonious dunes, here are some of the world’s great sonic mysteries.

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