Best Science Articles & Videos on the internet • Discoverology

Science

Read the best science articles from around the internet, or watch the most insightful science videos from platforms like Youtube, Vimeo or leading science publishers like The Smithsonian, Quanta Magazine, New Scientist, Pacific Standard and many more.

How Political Opinions Change

How Political Opinions Change

Explainers, Politics, Psychology, Science

A powerful shaping factor about our social and political worlds is how they are structured by group belonging and identities. For instance, researchers have found that moral and emotion messages on contentious political topics, such as gun-control and climate change, spread more rapidly within rather than between ideologically like-minded networks.

What Would Happen If Earth Started To Spin Faster?

What Would Happen If Earth Started To Spin Faster?

Nature, Science

The equator spins at 1,037 mph, whereas Chicago takes a more leisurely (approximately 750 mph) pace. If we could speed up Earth’s rotation by one mile per hour, the sea level around the equator would rise by a few inches as water migrates there from the poles.

How Space Tries To Kill You And Make You Ugly

How Space Tries To Kill You And Make You Ugly

Long Reads, Science

Outer space is the most noxious of substances: devoid of air and filled with a soup of deadly particles in the form of high-energy photons and energetic bits of atomic nuclei. The lack of gravity there affects every element of your being, as even the proteins in your body can’t figure out which way is up.

How One NASA Image Tells Dozens Of Stories

How One NASA Image Tells Dozens Of Stories

Nature, Science, Videos, World

In 2016, NASA used the Suomi NPP weather satellite to create a high resolution image of the earth at night. It can help us better understand the current developments and conflicts underway. The amount of light pollution is most severe in heavily populated areas, as well as in regions of high prosperity.

How A Volcano In Hawaii Became A Battleground For Astronomy

How A Volcano In Hawaii Became A Battleground For Astronomy

Long Reads, Science

Native Hawaiians are protecting the mountain of Maunakea, at the heart of Hawaii’s Big Island, from the construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) at its summit, where the facility would join venerable observatories like the twin Keck domes and NASA’s Infrared Telescope Facility.

The Canadian Genius Who Created Modern AI

The Canadian Genius Who Created Modern AI

Science, Tech, Videos

For nearly 40 years, Geoff Hinton has been trying to get computers to learn like people do, a quest almost everyone thought was crazy or at least hopeless – right up until the moment it revolutionized the field. In this video, Bloomberg Businessweek’s Ashlee Vance meets the Godfather of AI.

Austin Rossborough

Inspiration
Austin Rossborough
We're Getting Closer To The Quantum Internet, But What Is It?

We're Getting Closer To The Quantum Internet, But What Is It?

Explainers, Innovation, Science, Tech

Instead of the bits that today’s network uses, which can only express a value of either 0 or 1, the future quantum internet would utilize qubits of quantum information, which can take on an infinite number of values. A quibit is the unit of information for a quantum computer; it’s like a bit in an ordinary computer.

Religion Is About Emotion Regulation, And It’s Very Good At It

Religion Is About Emotion Regulation, And It’s Very Good At It

Life, Science

Sigmund Freud argued that we humans are naturally awful creatures – aggressive, narcissistic wolves. We have the civilizing influence of religion to steer us toward charity, compassion and cooperation by a system of carrots and sticks, otherwise known as heaven and hell.

The Radioactive 'Capital' Of The World

The Radioactive 'Capital' Of The World

Science, Videos, World

Jachymov, a small uranium mining town in the northwest of the Czech Republic, has been key in the field of radioactivity research. More than a century ago, Marie and Pierre Curie based their revolutionary work on radioactivity on material brought from there.

People Born Blind Are Mysteriously Protected From Schizophrenia

People Born Blind Are Mysteriously Protected From Schizophrenia

Health, Science

It was something Tom Pollak had heard whispers about—an odd factoid, referred to now and again, usually with bewilderment: No person who was born blind has ever been diagnosed with schizophrenia. Over the past 60-some years, scientists around the world have been writing about this mystery.

Seven Mysterious Sounds Science Has Yet To Solve

Seven Mysterious Sounds Science Has Yet To Solve

Science

Sounds of unknown origin can be more than unsettling; they can inspire decades of mythos and fear—and obsessive scientific inquiry. From jarring radio broadcasts to harmonious dunes, here are some of the world’s great sonic mysteries.

China Is Building An Artificial Sun

China Is Building An Artificial Sun

Innovation, Science

China has announced advancing plans for its nuclear fusion device known colloquially as an “artificial sun.” The extremely high temperatures of 360 million degrees Fahrenheit lead to the titular effect: literally, the nucleuses of two or more atoms are fused, and the process generates energy.

Can Ageing Be Delayed, Stopped Or Even Reversed?

Can Ageing Be Delayed, Stopped Or Even Reversed?

Health, Life, Science, Videos

This is the pursuit of a much longer, healthier life span using science and genetics to achieve it. Who hasn’t dreamed of staying young but how far will you be prepared to go to achieve that dream? BBC’s Gabriela Torres meets the self-experimenters and scientists who are trying to dramatically extend our lives.

Nina Dodd

Inspiration
Nina Dodd
A Banana Grown At Subzero Temps Also Has An Edible Peel

A Banana Grown At Subzero Temps Also Has An Edible Peel

Food, Innovation, Nature, Science

A Japanese farm introduced a new crop this winter: an organic banana with a peel that’s thin enough to eat. In a nod to this appealing outer covering, Setsuzo Tanaka, the banana’s inventor, has named his creation the Mongee (“mon-gay”) banana — which means “incredible banana” in Japanese.

The Rise Of Junk Science

The Rise Of Junk Science

Long Reads, Media, Science

Fake publications are corrupting the world of research—and influencing real news. At the most benign level of the junk industry are papers, published in journals with no effective screening process, that are obvious nonsense.

Can One Earthquake Trigger Another On The Other Side Of The World?

Can One Earthquake Trigger Another On The Other Side Of The World?

Nature, Science, World

It’s well known that natural disasters can cause others in their immediate vicinity, for instance, hurricanes are often accompanied by flooding, and earthquakes are followed by aftershocks. But what about longer distance interactions? Could one earthquake trigger another on the other side of the world?

3D Printing Ink May Solve The “Toothpaste Problem”

3D Printing Ink May Solve The “Toothpaste Problem”

Innovation, Science

A new kind of ink for 3D printing liquifies when pressed through the nozzle of a 3D printer, but then quickly returns to its original shape, researchers report. The invention paves the way for personalized biomaterial implants, according to new research. As things stand, however, personalized implants remain a long way off.

Behind The Scenes Of A Radical New Cancer Cure

Behind The Scenes Of A Radical New Cancer Cure

Health, Long Reads, Science

CAR-T involves removing a patient’s own blood, filtering for immune cells called T-cells, and genetically engineering those cells to recognize and attack cancer. CAR-T made history in 2017 as the first FDA-approved gene therapy to treat any disease. The trials that led to approval showed response rates of 80 percent and above in aggressive leukemias and lymphomas that had resisted chemotherapy.

Tony Menias

Inspiration
Tony Menias
How To Survive 75 Hours Alone In The Ocean

How To Survive 75 Hours Alone In The Ocean

Health, Science

In n February 2006, Robert Hewitt was scuba diving near Mana Island, off the coast of New Zealand’s North Island. Amazingly, Hewitt spent the next 75 hours in the water, drifting back and forth over a distance of nearly 40 miles before he was spotted by Navy diving friends and rescued.

The Key To Good Luck Is An Open Mind

The Key To Good Luck Is An Open Mind

Life, Psychology, Science

What do these people have that the rest of us don’t? It turns out “ability” is the key word here. Beyond their level of privilege or the circumstances they were born into, the luckiest people may have a specific set of skills that bring chance opportunities their way.

Antarctica Melting: Climate Change And The Journey To The 'Doomsday Glacier'

Antarctica Melting: Climate Change And The Journey To The 'Doomsday Glacier'

Nature, Science

Icefin has reached the point at which the warm ocean water meets the wall of ice at the front of the mighty Thwaites glacier – the point where this vast body of ice begins to melt. Glaciologists have described Thwaites as the “most important” glacier in the world, the “riskiest” glacier, even the “doomsday” glacier.

The Doomsday Invention: Will Artificial Intelligence Bring Us Utopia Or Destruction?

The Doomsday Invention: Will Artificial Intelligence Bring Us Utopia Or Destruction?

Innovation, Long Reads, Science, Tech

Philosopher Nick Bostrom argues that true artificial intelligence, if it is realized, might pose a danger that exceeds every previous threat from technology—even nuclear weapons—and that if its development is not managed carefully humanity risks engineering its own extinction.

'Light Is My New Drug': The Actually Convincing Science Of Light Therapy

'Light Is My New Drug': The Actually Convincing Science Of Light Therapy

Health, Psychology, Science

In recent years, research on light therapy has moved from the fringes of scientific discovery to something closer to the mainstream; its commercial uses are now following the same path, as these devices, once available only in spas, gyms, or dermatologists’ offices, become increasingly affordable for consumers.

How Scientists Imagined And Built An Undersea Utopia For Humans

How Scientists Imagined And Built An Undersea Utopia For Humans

Architecture, Cities, History, Science

During the late 1960s many believed revolutionary social and political change was imminent, and Jacques Cousteau was no exception. Soon there would be “undersea parliaments and new nations,” he wrote; “poets, architects, and painters would be needed to give expression” to this “new world.”

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