Rising Tides, Troubled Waters: The Future Of Our Ocean • Discoverology

Rising Tides, Troubled Waters: The Future Of Our Ocean

Long Reads, Nature

Ninety percent of the large fish that were here in the 1950s are now gone. One metric ton of plastic enters the ocean every four seconds. But the biggest problem, thanks largely to our insatiable appetite for fossil fuels, is that the ocean is heating up fast.

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