Revisiting The Infamous, Twisted, Now-Defunct Presidential Fitness Test • Discoverology

Revisiting The Infamous, Twisted, Now-Defunct Presidential Fitness Test

Health, History

Way back in the 1950s, an Austro-Hungarian physical educator named Dr. Hans Kraus developed a 90-second fitness evaluation with his colleague Sonja Weber of the New York Presbyterian Hospital. It involved a series of six different movements which tested for basic strength and flexibility.

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