Repopulating A Japanese town • Discoverology

Repopulating A Japanese town

Cities, Videos, World

As the Japanese populace shrinks and ages, and young people leave the suburbs and rural areas for cities, more and more communities are becoming ghost towns. The municipality of Okutama, on the outskirts of Tokyo, has come up with a novel solution: Give away houses to young families for free.

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