Psychology Still Skews Western And Affluent. Can It Be Fixed? • Discoverology

Psychology Still Skews Western And Affluent. Can It Be Fixed?

Psychology

For decades, the overwhelming majority of psychology research has examined people who live in the United States and other affluent Western countries. By focusing on such a narrow population, psychology researchers have — mostly unwittingly — presented a skewed view of the human mind.

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