History, Media

Psychiatry, Racism, And The Birth Of ‘Sesame Street’

How an African-American psychiatrist helped design a groundbreaking television show as a radical therapeutic tool for helping minority preschoolers.

History, Politics

The Peruvian Corruption-Buster Bigger Than Mueller

With his implacable pursuit of the presidential trio, the corruption-busting prosecutor José Domingo Pérez has established an international template for how to prosecute former heads of state on graft charges.

Media, Science

The Rise Of Junk Science

Fake publications are corrupting the world of research—and influencing real news. At the most benign level of the junk industry are papers, published in journals with no effective screening process, that are obvious nonsense.

Media, Science, Tech

Hollywood Is Quietly Using AI To Help Decide Which Movies To Make

AI will tell you who to cast and predict how much money you’ll make. Despite skepticism about specific applications, the tide might be turning. A single factor has convinced Hollywood to stop dismissing big data: Netflix.

History

The Forgotten History Of Greensboro’s A&T/Dudley Revolt

In May 1969, a controversial election for student body president at Dudley High School in Greensboro, North Carolina, turned into an open revolt against police repression and racial segregation.

Cities, History

How Philadelphia Became “The First City That Bombed Itself”

In 1985, an armed standoff between Philadelphia police and members of a radical black liberation group, resulted in the deaths of eleven people. No police officers or city officials were ever charged for their role in what’s known as the MOVE bombing.

History

Why The Brazilian Soccer Team Wouldn’t Wear White – Until Now

White is also the color that the Brazilian national soccer team was wearing in the infamous “Maracanazo” match, a decisive showdown against Uruguay in the 1950 World Cup. Nearly 70 years later Brazil is ready to tempt fate.

History, Photos

100 Years Ago In Photos: A Look Back At 1919

A century ago, the Treaty of Versailles was signed, as much of the world was still recovering from the devastation of World War I. Rebuilding was just beginning, refugees were returning home, orphans were being cared for, and a global influenza outbreak was being battled.

Crime, History, Politics

Who Killed Sweden’s Prime Minister?

Three decades ago, Olof Palme was assassinated on Stockholm’s busiest street. The killer has never been found. Could the discovery of new evidence finally close the case?

History, Videos

“Balloonfest”, The Spectacle That Became A Tragedy

In September 1986, the city of Cleveland attempted to set a special record: the simultaneous launch of 1.5 million balloons. But fate intervened, and the result was both crazier and more tragic than anyone could have imagined.

Design, Media

BrewDog’s New Ad Does What It Says On The Tin

BrewDog has come to be known for its bold one-liners and playful spin on typical communications. The ballsy beer brand has teamed with Uncommon on a tongue-in-cheek campaign that doesn’t really say much at all – on purpose.

Media

Amnesty’s Syria Ads Prove Humankind Can Be Worse Than Natural Disasters

Amnesty International is known for its provocative ads for human rights. In its campaign for the freedom and democracy of Syria, war zones where housing and huge blocks of land are destroyed have been depicted in ads.

History, World

How Half A Tonne Of Cocaine Transformed The Life Of An Island

In 2001, a smugglers’ yacht washed up in the Azores and disgorged its contents. The island of São Miguel was quickly flooded with high-grade cocaine – and nearly 20 years on, it is still feeling the effects.

Innovation, Media, Nature

Russian Startup Wants To Put Huge Ads In Space

The first of StartRocket’s space-based ads could go up by 2021. The ads — a bit like skytyping, only in low-Earth orbit rather than in the atmosphere — would be visible only at night but could be seen from just about anywhere on the planet.

Economics, Media, Tech

Down And Out In the Gig Economy

Gig economies are ersatz structures, designed to skirt labor laws and offload risk and expense onto workers themselves. They serve the whims of capital.

Art, History

A Secret Cupid Is Emerging From A 17th-Century Vermeer

During a routine round of conservation on Johannes Vermeer’s 17th-century Girl Reading a Letter at an Open Window, art detectives realized that a section of the canvas had been painted over after the Dutch artist’s death in 1675, concealing a cupid figure.

History, Life, Videos

“Quadrangle”, Award-Winning Doc About Marriage And Divorce

A documentary about two ‘conventional’ couples that swapped partners and lived in a group marriage in the early 70s, hoping to pioneer an alternative to divorce and pave the way for how people would live in the future.

Cities, History, Photos

Underground Photos From New York’s Seediest Years

The “Poet of Radical Photography”, Miron Zownir, captures the provocative energy and aggressive hedonism of New York City in the 80s.

History, Life, Politics

Who Owns South Africa?

The Glen Grey Act was the first piece of legislation to enshrine in law the residential separation of the races. It was also the basis for the notorious Natives Land Act of 1913, which in its final form allocated a mere thirteen percent of all arable land to the black majority. 

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