Proof That Bad Weather Makes For Good Photography • Discoverology

Proof That Bad Weather Makes For Good Photography

While most sane people would run for cover at the sight of heavy rain or snow, that’s the precise moment when French photographer Christophe Jacrot pulls out his camera and gets to work. 

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