Photos Showing Rare Moments From The Front Lines Of The Vietnam War • Discoverology

Photos Showing Rare Moments From The Front Lines Of The Vietnam War

History, Photos

Rare is it to find a photograph showing a relaxed, almost spirited look at the Vietnam War. Yet, here are photographs of men, taken in the quiet, downtime of war. Many of these photographs, originally from old photo slides, were digitized by Kendra Rennick.

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Photos, Tech

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