Photos of Andy Warhol and His Circle, Taken (Secretly) by His Close Friend • Discoverology

Photos of Andy Warhol and His Circle, Taken (Secretly) by His Close Friend

Photographer and former editor of Interview magazine Bob Colacello remembers a different age of celebrity, art and popular culture within Andy Warhol’s orbit.

Related topics
Related posts
World Underwater, Exploring The Future Of The Earth

World Underwater, Exploring The Future Of The Earth

Nature Photos

Inspired by a trip to Venice, Italy, the series World Underwater explores the future of Earth. It imagines our world absolutely overwhelmed by global floods and rising waters. Images by American photographer and 3D artist Hayden Clay.

Watch Picasso Make A Masterpiece

Watch Picasso Make A Masterpiece

Art Videos

‘Le Mystère Picasso’ is a remarkable documentary film made by French director, Henri-Georges Clouzot, in which stop-action and time-lapse photography are used to capture Picasso at work. Not many of the works he created for the documentary survive but here’s how one of them came to be.

Haunting Photos Of An Abandoned Italian Madhouse

Haunting Photos Of An Abandoned Italian Madhouse

Health Photos

When German-born photographer Andy Schwetz visited the Manicomio di Racconigi, an abandoned insane asylum in Italy, he was struck by the horror of the procedures performed there, from electroshock therapy to experimental operations.

Stephen Shore’s Unorthodox Photography Teaches Us To Celebrate The Everyday

Stephen Shore’s Unorthodox Photography Teaches Us To Celebrate The Everyday

Art Photos

Though color film had already been used for decades, it was considered crass by the heavyweights of black-and-white photography and was most often used in advertising or by amateurs. Shore is often included in the cohort of artists that brought about the rise of color in the 70s, but not given credit for his prescience.

The Dollhouses Of Death That Changed Forensic Science

The Dollhouses Of Death That Changed Forensic Science

Art Crime Videos

Frances Glessner Lee created dollhouses with dead dolls. Her miniatures significantly advanced forensics and forensic science, but they aren’t just CSI curios – they’re complex, confounding works of art that manage to be morbid and beautiful at the same time.

Art Forgery Is Easier Than Ever, And It’s A Great Way To Launder Money

Art Forgery Is Easier Than Ever, And It’s A Great Way To Launder Money

Art Crime Long Reads

More and more rich people are buying art and stashing it in strange places. According to infamous scammers, it’s not even close to legit. In some respects, it mirrors the giant pools of money sloshing around in Manhattan or London real estate—funds that are relatively concentrated in a few hands spending it in a few places.

Lives Adrift In A Warming World

Lives Adrift In A Warming World

Long Reads Nature Photos World

If the Earth’s average temperature increases 2 degrees Celsius by the year 2100, humankind will see catastrophic changes. For millions of people, this extreme warming is already reality, in places like Qatar, Colorado and Angola. And Aaliyah, at the age of 9, has become a climate refugee in Newtok, Alaska.

Photographer Toby Coulson Stirs Up Intrigue In The Ordinary

Photographer Toby Coulson Stirs Up Intrigue In The Ordinary

Photos

With a portfolio spanning multiple photographic genres, it seems like no subject is too daunting for Toby Coulson to document. It’s probably his insatiable interest in the beauty and strangeness of the ordinary that makes the London-based photographer’s work so charming.

Short Film: Ikhwène (Brotherhood) by Meryam Joobeur

Short Film: Ikhwène (Brotherhood) by Meryam Joobeur

Art Videos

One of the most acclaimed shorts of the year, and a frontrunner for Oscar. Mohamed is a shepherd in rural Tunisia with his wife and two young sons. Their world is shaken when their oldest son returns after a long journey with a mysterious woman he says is his wife.

Detroit’s Salt Mine: A City Beneath The City

Detroit’s Salt Mine: A City Beneath The City

Cities Photos

This gigantic mine, 1,160 feet beneath the surface, spreads out under Detroit over more than 1,400 acres with 50 miles of roads. A huge sea covering the region evaporated more than 400 million years ago, forming salt deposits that were gradually buried by glacial activity.

We use cookies on this website to analyse your use of our products and services, provide content from third parties and assist with our marketing efforts. Learn more about our use of cookies and available controls: cookie policy. Please be aware that your experience may be disrupted until you accept cookies.