Pay Attention: Practice Can Make Your Brain Better At Focusing • Discoverology

Pay Attention: Practice Can Make Your Brain Better At Focusing

Practicing paying attention can boost performance on a new task, and change the way the brain processes information, a new study says. This might explain why learning a new skill can start out feeling grueling, but eventually becomes more natural.

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