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The Inevitable Decade Of Marvel

The Inevitable Decade Of Marvel

Business, Long Reads, Media

On July 21, 2019, ‘Avengers: Endgame’ became the highest-grossing film ever, on its way to adding nearly $2.8 billion to the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s $22.5 billion global box office total. The 2010s were defined by this superhero takeover—though the plans for it were laid even before the decade began.

This Was The Decade Climate Change Slapped Us In The Face

This Was The Decade Climate Change Slapped Us In The Face

Nature, Science

Broken temperature records, unnatural disasters, and homes lost would show just how catastrophically humans had transformed the planet. It’s been a decade of adapting to a new normal while clumsily figuring out how to safeguard the future from a climate crisis that’s only going to get worse.

Why You Spend So Much Money At IKEA

Why You Spend So Much Money At IKEA

Economics, Psychology, Videos

IKEA’s “aesthetic per dollar” ratio is very high, says neuromarketer and author of “The Buying Brain” Dr. A. K. Pradeep. Ikea’s affordable style is its “category-busting-metric,” or what makes it stand out from all the other brands in that space, he says.

The Floating Utopia Of Salesforce Park

The Floating Utopia Of Salesforce Park

Architecture, Cities, Tech

Salesforce Park, in downtown San Francisco, sits atop the Salesforce Transit Center. It is a lush, five-and-a-half-acre rooftop arcadia of rolling meadows and meticulously landscaped, climatically harmonious, drought-tolerant flora. San Francisco’s newest public space reflects Big Tech’s influence—and a city’s anxieties.

The Death And Afterlife Of The Mall

The Death And Afterlife Of The Mall

Architecture, Cities, Videos

Once a cornerstone of American consumerism, shopping malls are now mostly ghost towns. In a new episode of The Atlantic’s Idea File, staff writers Jim and Deb Fallows explore the phenomenon of the dead mall, and its emerging afterlife.

How One American Citizen Was Forcibly Drafted Into The South Korean Army

How One American Citizen Was Forcibly Drafted Into The South Korean Army

History, Politics

Illinois-born Young Chun thought a stint teaching English in Korea would be a quick and easy way to pay off his mounting post-college debt. He could not have been more wrong. Chun became a victim of a collision between unforgiving bureaucracy and the meddling of an unknown family member thousands of miles away.

These Death-Defying Human Towers Build On Catalan Tradition

These Death-Defying Human Towers Build On Catalan Tradition

Videos, World

Catalonia is ruled by the Spanish government, but its people have been constructing independent kingdoms for centuries. By climbing up backs and balancing on shoulders, Catalonians of all ages stack their bodies on-top each other to build castells, or human towers.

Pakpoom Silaphan

Inspiration
Pakpoom Silaphan
Life Under The Algorithm

Life Under The Algorithm

Business, Economics, Life, Long Reads

Increase your output, get paid more. Wages go up with productivity. Until, it turns out, they don’t anymore. The unwinding of this agreement in recent decades, such that workers must continue to produce more without expecting it to show up in their pay stubs, has now been the subject of a good deal of discussion and debate.

The Italian Town That Always Smells Like Panettone

The Italian Town That Always Smells Like Panettone

Food, World

Since 1922, Pinerolo has been home to Galup, a bakery-factory that specializes in northern Italian enriched breads, an operation that defines this small town—from its aroma to its employment options. The town always smells like panettone.

Portrait Of A Place: Steel Town

Portrait Of A Place: Steel Town

Videos

Capable of producing nearly five million tonnes of steel each year, the steelworks in Port Talbot, South Wales is the UK’s largest—and it’s currently losing £1 million each day. Here, London-based director Robin Mason talks about his portrait of the town at a vital moment in its history.

The Influencer And The Hit Man

The Influencer And The Hit Man

Apps, Crime, Tech

How a years-long domain name feud for DoItForState.com ended in a bloody shootout. “Do It For State” is the hyperviral tagline associated with the social media company State Snaps, which aggregates and posts debaucherous college-aged behavior on its Instagram, Snapchat, and Twitter.

Photoprovocations By Russian Sergey Chilikov

Photoprovocations By Russian Sergey Chilikov

Art, Photos, World

Photography wasn’t given credence as a legitimate art form and even classic Soviet photography wasn’t included in museum exhibitions. In order to get their work seen, photographers started their own clubs, exchanging work with other clubs and organizing their own exhibitions and festivals.

3D Printing Homes For The Homeless In Austin

3D Printing Homes For The Homeless In Austin

Cities, Innovation, Tech, Videos

ICON, the 3D-printing construction company, has partnered with Mobile Loaves & Fishes (MLF) to build 3D-printed homes in Austin. The only neighborhood of its kind in the nation, Community First! Village provides affordable, permanent housing and a supportive community for men and women coming out of chronic homelessness.

A Banana Grown At Subzero Temps Also Has An Edible Peel

A Banana Grown At Subzero Temps Also Has An Edible Peel

Food, Innovation, Nature, Science

A Japanese farm introduced a new crop this winter: an organic banana with a peel that’s thin enough to eat. In a nod to this appealing outer covering, Setsuzo Tanaka, the banana’s inventor, has named his creation the Mongee (“mon-gay”) banana — which means “incredible banana” in Japanese.

iPhones Are Being Turned Into Ultrasound Devices To Diagnose Patients

iPhones Are Being Turned Into Ultrasound Devices To Diagnose Patients

Health, Innovation, Tech

The world’s first handheld ultrasound device, Butterfly iQ, will give hope to 4.7 billion people who don’t have access to medical imaging, revolutionizing modern medicine. Butterfly Network founder Dr Jonathan Rothberg invented the tool, a battery-operated device the size of an electric shaver that diagnoses abnormalities within seconds.

Sanja Milenkovic

Inspiration
Sanja Milenkovic
The One-Traffic-Light Town With Some Of The Fastest Internet In The U.S.

The One-Traffic-Light Town With Some Of The Fastest Internet In The U.S.

Politics, Tech

Connecting rural America to broadband is a popular talking point on the campaign trail. In one Kentucky community, it’s already a way of life. McKee, an Appalachian town of about twelve hundred tucked into the Pigeon Roost Creek valley, is the seat of Jackson County, one of the poorest counties in the country.

What We Get Wrong About Time

What We Get Wrong About Time

Explainers, Life, Psychology

“Time” is the most frequently used noun in the English language. Most of us tend to think of time as linear, absolute and constantly “running out” – but is that really true? And how can we change our perceptions to feel better about its passing?

The History Of George Laurer And The Barcode

The History Of George Laurer And The Barcode

Business, History

A 67 cent packet of gum has ballooned into an enormous industry, and five billion barcodes are scanned each and every day. But how did we get to this point, and who was responsible for the UPC barcode?

The Key To Good Luck Is An Open Mind

The Key To Good Luck Is An Open Mind

Life, Psychology, Science

What do these people have that the rest of us don’t? It turns out “ability” is the key word here. Beyond their level of privilege or the circumstances they were born into, the luckiest people may have a specific set of skills that bring chance opportunities their way.

The Curse Of America’s Illogical School-Day Schedule

The Curse Of America’s Illogical School-Day Schedule

Business, Life

The average start time for public high schools, 7:59, requires teens to get up earlier than is ideal for their biological clocks, meaning many teens disrupt their natural sleep patterns every school day. The world, apparently, does not revolve around parents either. Their lives also tend to be mismatched with school-day schedules.

The Surprising Psychology Of Dieting And Plate Design

The Surprising Psychology Of Dieting And Plate Design

Food, Psychology

You’ve probably heard the idea that using smaller plates and bowls can affect your perception of how much you’re eating, thereby helping you eat less. But how well does it work? A new study sheds light on that popular theory, finding that if you’re really hungry, it doesn’t work.

Can Tiny Houses Save Detroit?

Can Tiny Houses Save Detroit?

Architecture, Cities, Videos

Detroit is grappling with both devastating poverty and a hot real estate market. But Rev. Faith Fowler of the nonprofit Cass Community Social Services sees a way to remedy both: Develop tiny houses, and create a rent-to-own financing mechanism to help impoverished Detroiters become owners of those homes.

The Dark Side Of Electronic Waste Recycling

The Dark Side Of Electronic Waste Recycling

Business, Nature, Science, Tech

Electronics can be hazardous when disposed of improperly, and the Basel Action Network, or BAN, investigates the underground world of the e-waste trade. The nonprofit group secretly embeds trackers in discarded devices, then hands them to recyclers to see where they end up, exposing bad practices in the process.

Why I Wanted To Finish My Father’s Life’s Work

Why I Wanted To Finish My Father’s Life’s Work

Business, Health, Life

My father was among the founders of ‘Decision Science’ in the 1960s and 70s…and spent the last 10 years of his life trying to write a popular book on decision-making for the masses, something that would cement his legacy. Karen Brown recalls the pain and joy of fulfilling a deathbed promise.

Dasha Peers

Inspiration
Dasha Peers
Why Cruise Lines Keep Cutting Their Ships In Half

Why Cruise Lines Keep Cutting Their Ships In Half

Business, Economics

In a process called “stretching,” the Star Breeze is getting pulled apart to make room for a new, 84-foot, 1,250-ton prefab midsection addition. Think of it like unsnapping (or unwelding) two Legos and putting another block in between. But with a boat.

How Two Lottery-Crazed Bank Clerks Cooked Up China’s Biggest Bank Robbery

How Two Lottery-Crazed Bank Clerks Cooked Up China’s Biggest Bank Robbery

Crime, Long Reads

On April 16, 2007, the fuzzy, grey star had just set, and the bustling streets cast further into darkness, when police detectives arrived at the Agricultural Bank of China. When detectives entered the vault, they were stumped. The suspects had left behind only one piece of physical evidence: a bag full of lottery tickets.

The Dictatorship Of Data

The Dictatorship Of Data

Economics, History

Big data is poised to transform society. Yet big data also exacerbates a very old problem: relying on the numbers when they are far more fallible than we think. Nothing underscores the consequences of data analysis gone awry more than the story of Robert McNamara.

How A Volcanic Eruption Helped Create Modern Scotland

How A Volcanic Eruption Helped Create Modern Scotland

History, Nature, Science

Over seven terrible years in the 1690s, crops failed, farming villages emptied, and severe famine killed up to 15% of the entire population of Scotland. Soon after, the formerly independent nation joined Great Britain. Now, researchers suggest volcanic eruptions thousands of kilometers away may have helped spark this political transformation.

The Long-Forgotten Vigilante Murders Of The San Luis Valley

The Long-Forgotten Vigilante Murders Of The San Luis Valley

Crime, History, Long Reads

For more than a century, historians, writers, and artists were guilty of creating a mythologized version of the American West. How history forgot Felipe and Vivián Espinosa, two of the American West’s most brutal killers—and the complicated story behind their murderous rampage.

Behind The Walls Of Brazil's Secretive Gated Communities

Behind The Walls Of Brazil's Secretive Gated Communities

Photos, World

Photographer Giovana Schluter grew up uneasy in one of Brazil’s many private neighbourhoods – artificial worlds built for the middle classes. So years later, she returned to a manufactured enclave just like the one of her youth, hoping to get to the heart of their emptiness.

Wild Juxtapositions Of Saudi Arabia Modern And Ancient

Wild Juxtapositions Of Saudi Arabia Modern And Ancient

Architecture, Photos, World

Few countries in history have experienced as sudden a transformation as Saudi Arabia. The discovery and exploitation of oil brought an unprecedented influx of wealth. Photographer Peter Bogaczewicz captures the past and present of the oil-rich kingdom as it undergoes dramatic transformation.

At War With The Thruth

At War With The Thruth

Crime, History, Long Reads, Politics

A confidential trove of government documents obtained by The Washington Post reveals that senior U.S. officials failed to tell the truth about the war in Afghanistan throughout the 18-year campaign, making rosy pronouncements they knew to be false and hiding unmistakable evidence the war had become unwinnable.

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