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Read the best nature articles from around the internet, or watch the most insightful nature videos from platforms like Youtube, Vimeo or leading nature publishers like The New York Times, The Guardian, BBC, New Republic, Washington Post and many more.

This Is What The Earth’s Climate Will Look Like In 2050

This Is What The Earth’s Climate Will Look Like In 2050

Nature, World

We know that Earth will continue to warm. We know that the adverse impacts of climate change are disproportionately larger as we go to higher temperatures and that the risk of irreversible and disastrous changes increases. We know that sea levels will continue to rise and that melting of ice caps will continue.

China's Man-Made Forest In The Desert

China's Man-Made Forest In The Desert

Nature, Videos, World

In 1986, the city of Aksu in China’s Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region began an ambitious tree-planting project that looked to turn swaths of desert into forest. The result was over 13 million acres of green that became the Kekeya greening project.

Kiribati: A Drowning Paradise In The South Pacific

Kiribati: A Drowning Paradise In The South Pacific

Nature, Videos, World

UN estimates indicate that Kiribati could disappear in just 30 or 40 years. That’s because the average elevation is less than two meters above sea level. And some of the knock-on effects of climate change have made the situation more difficult.

The Cost Of Keeping Singapore Squeaky Clean

The Cost Of Keeping Singapore Squeaky Clean

Cities, Economics, Nature

Founding father and first Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew kicked off the Keep Singapore Clean campaign 50 years ago. The aim wasn’t just to make the city more pleasant. A cleaner city, Lee Kuan Yew reasoned, would create a stronger economy.

The Rail Industry’s Secret, Decades-Long Fight Against The Climate

The Rail Industry’s Secret, Decades-Long Fight Against The Climate

Business, Nature, Science

For nearly 30 years, America’s four biggest rail companies—which move the majority of the country’s coal—have spent millions to deny climate science and block climate policy. They have joined or funded groups that attacked individual scientists and rejected reports from major scientific institutions.

Bashir Sultani

Inspiration
Bashir Sultani
The Drone Boat Of ‘Shipwreck Alley’

The Drone Boat Of ‘Shipwreck Alley’

Nature, Tech

Divers flock from all over the world to see the wrecks for themselves each year — and last spring, they were joined by an unusual interloper: an autonomous boat named BEN. BEN is a self-driving boat that’s been tasked with making maps, and to help lay bare the long-lost secrets of the lakebed.

A Long Walk's End

A Long Walk's End

Crime, Long Reads, Nature

On May 18 2015, the FBI announced the search for a 53-year-old accountant accused of embezzling $8.7 million from an Ohio-based Pepsi distributor had come to an end. His name: James T. Hammes. Authorities say Hammes took the funds through a series of banking transfers while working as a controller for the distributor. Then he went for a hike.

How To Eat Seafood Responsibly: A Guide From Chef Eric Ripert

How To Eat Seafood Responsibly: A Guide From Chef Eric Ripert

Food, Nature

In addition to responsibly sourcing fish, Eric Ripert stresses that seeking out freshness and using proper technique will help guarantee success with fish in the home kitchen. Here are a few ways he recommends keeping seafood cookery interesting, delicious, and sustainable.

Russian Startup Wants To Put Huge Ads In Space

Russian Startup Wants To Put Huge Ads In Space

Innovation, Media, Nature

The first of StartRocket’s space-based ads could go up by 2021. The ads — a bit like skytyping, only in low-Earth orbit rather than in the atmosphere — would be visible only at night but could be seen from just about anywhere on the planet.

The British Once Built A 1,100-Mile Hedge Through The Middle Of India

The British Once Built A 1,100-Mile Hedge Through The Middle Of India

Economics, History, Nature

There was nothing charming about what the British built. It wasn’t meant to protect anything except imperial revenue. It grew along the Inland Customs Line, a bureaucratic barrier that the British created to impose a high salt tax on the people living on one side of the line—the relatively saltless one.

A Corridor Runs Through It

A Corridor Runs Through It

Long Reads, Nature

Imagine yourself as a modern-day alligator in central Florida, where 12 acres of wild land is sacrificed to development every hour. This is a story about what happens when the South’s creatures no longer have room to move — and about a project aimed at preserving the few corridors that connect what remains of the wild land.

Could Air-Conditioning Fix Climate Change?

Could Air-Conditioning Fix Climate Change?

Innovation, Nature, Science

Air conditioning systems can replace the entire air volume in an office building five or 10 times an hour.  Machines that capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere—a developing fix for climate change—also depend on moving large volumes of air.  So why not save energy by tacking the carbon capture machine onto the air conditioner?

The Empty Houses That Foreign Aid Built

The Empty Houses That Foreign Aid Built

Long Reads, Nature, World

After the devastation of the 2004 tsunami, aid agencies promised to rebuild Indonesia “better.” Fifteen years later, their failures are all too obvious. The disaster hit Aceh the hardest. The evacuation buildings are unmistakably the shiniest features of the city’s newly built landscape.

Nikolay Schegolev

Inspiration
Nikolay Schegolev
The Healing Power of Gardens

The Healing Power of Gardens

Health, Nature, Psychology

Oliver Sacks on the Psychological and Physiological Consolations of Nature: “In forty years of medical practice, I have found only two types of non-pharmaceutical ‘therapy’ to be vitally important for patients with chronic neurological diseases: music and gardens.”

How A Shipwrecked Crew Survived 10 Days Lost At Sea

How A Shipwrecked Crew Survived 10 Days Lost At Sea

Nature

On November 25, 2019, Chris Carney and his two-man crew, Pete Brown and Jun Sumiyama, set off from Japan on their way to Hawaii in a 42-foot sailboat. This is the story of how three crewmen lived more than a week in the middle of the Pacific in a wrecked sailboat with almost nothing.

The Fight To Save Broad Beach

The Fight To Save Broad Beach

Long Reads, Nature

Malibu homeowners banded together to address sea level rise. A decade later, they are at war with the city, the surfers, and each other. The choices are clear: Do nothing and lose the coast. Stall by dredging in sand, bouldering up revetments and emergency sea walls. Or look at long-term solutions.

Design Schemes To Survive Climate Change

Design Schemes To Survive Climate Change

Architecture, Design, Innovation, Nature

A new generation of ­architects, designers, and experts is creating infrastructure and buildings that respond to both extreme conditions and ongoing stress. Here’s a look at some of the most ­innovative approaches to living in a ­increasingly apocalyptic world.

Can Sea Water Desalination Save The World?

Can Sea Water Desalination Save The World?

Nature, Videos

Ocean water is saturated with salt, and undrinkable. Most of the freshwater is locked away in glaciers or deep underground. Less than one percent of it is available to us. So why can’t we just take all that seawater, filter out the salt, and have a nearly unlimited supply of clean, drinkable water?

As Warming Waters Make Shellfish Toxic, A Way Of Life Becomes Deadly For Alaskans

As Warming Waters Make Shellfish Toxic, A Way Of Life Becomes Deadly For Alaskans

Food, Long Reads, Nature

Coastal states have developed statewide systems to keep their recreational and subsistence harvesters safe from paralytic shellfish poisoning. Alaska has no such system. State environmental health officials say the sheer length of its coast makes monitoring shellfish for the toxin impossible.

How Long Will Australia Be Livable?

How Long Will Australia Be Livable?

Nature, Science

As the country suffers through one of its worst droughts on record, and heat waves shatter temperature records not once but twice within the same summer week, some are asking whether Australians can afford to keep returning to the same parched, scorched landscapes.

Michael Crichton

Inspiration
Michael Crichton
The Whale Arctic Visitor Center By Dorte Mandrup

The Whale Arctic Visitor Center By Dorte Mandrup

Architecture, Nature, World

300 km North of the Arctic Circle, on the tip of the island Andøya lies Andenes. A small town located amid dramatic landscapes – both above and below the ocean’s surface. The new Arctic attraction, The Whale, tells the story of the big inhabitants of this underwater world, rising as a soft hill on the rocky shore– as if a giant had lifted a thin layer of the crust of the earth and created a cavity underneath.

A Banana Grown At Subzero Temps Also Has An Edible Peel

A Banana Grown At Subzero Temps Also Has An Edible Peel

Food, Innovation, Nature, Science

A Japanese farm introduced a new crop this winter: an organic banana with a peel that’s thin enough to eat. In a nod to this appealing outer covering, Setsuzo Tanaka, the banana’s inventor, has named his creation the Mongee (“mon-gay”) banana — which means “incredible banana” in Japanese.

How Air Conditioning Created The Modern City

How Air Conditioning Created The Modern City

Cities, Economics, Nature

The shopping mall would have been inconceivable without air conditioning, as would the deep-plan and glass-walled office block, as would computer servers. The expansion of tract housing in postwar suburban America relied on affordable domestic air conditioning units.

Under The Darkest Sky

Under The Darkest Sky

Nature

Today, 40 percent of oil and gas rigs working in the United States are located on what is known as the Permian Basin, a vast oil reserve covering 75,000 square miles in West Texas and southeastern New Mexico. A movement is forming to protect the night sky from light pollution given off by the drilling operations.

The Deep Ocean Is The Final Frontier On Planet Earth

The Deep Ocean Is The Final Frontier On Planet Earth

Nature, Science, Tech, Videos

Only three people have ever reached the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean. The deep is a world without sunlight, of freezing temperatures, and immense pressure. It’s remained largely unexplored until now. Cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to go deeper than ever before.

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