Millennials Have Discovered 'Going Out' Sucks • Discoverology

Millennials Have Discovered ‘Going Out’ Sucks

Life

This is the first generation ever to admit that going out actually sucks. “More young people are choosing to spend a quiet evening at home.” We’re not even cool enough to get drunk: “A 2016 survey by Heineken found that when millennials do bother to venture outside, 75 percent drink in moderation.”

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