Light Dawns: Why Is The Speed Of Light The Speed Of Light? • Discoverology

Light Dawns: Why Is The Speed Of Light The Speed Of Light?

Science

We have fixed the speed of light in a vacuum at exactly 299,792.458 kilometres per second. Why this particular speed and not something else? Or, to put it another way, where does the speed of light come from?

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Nature, Science

Broken temperature records, unnatural disasters, and homes lost would show just how catastrophically humans had transformed the planet. It’s been a decade of adapting to a new normal while clumsily figuring out how to safeguard the future from a climate crisis that’s only going to get worse.

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Nature, Science, World

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Explainers, Science, Videos

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Nature, Science

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Science

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History, Nature, Science

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Science, Tech

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Health, Science

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Life, Psychology, Science

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Health, Science

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