Life Against The Odds In Australia's Underground Town • Discoverology

Life Against The Odds In Australia’s Underground Town

Videos, World

Coober Pedy is at the center of Australia’s opal mining industry. Now the town, where 60% of its residents live underground, is becoming a leader in sustainable living.

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