Letting Slower Passengers Board Airplane First Really Is Faster, Study Finds • Discoverology

Letting Slower Passengers Board Airplane First Really Is Faster, Study Finds

Commercial airlines often prioritize boarding for passengers traveling with small children, or for those who need extra assistance, before starting to board the faster passengers. It’s counter-intuitive, but it turns out that letting slower passengers board first actually results in a more efficient process.

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