Kidney Stone Drug Found To Starve Pancreatic Cancer Cells To Death • Discoverology

Kidney Stone Drug Found To Starve Pancreatic Cancer Cells To Death

A research team at Columbia University has made an exciting discovery, finding that a compound currently under development for a rare kidney stone disease can starve pancreatic cancer cells of a key amino acid they depend on, a technique that proved to stop tumor growth in mice.

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How Emotional Intelligence Boosts Your Endurance

How Emotional Intelligence Boosts Your Endurance

Explainers Health Life Psychology

People who test highly on emotional intelligence tend to be successful in many walks of life. What’s less clear is if testing someone’s emotional intelligence tells you something new about their prospects that you wouldn’t get from testing more traditional things like their IQ and “Big Five” personality traits.

Relax, Turn Off Your Phone, And Go To Sleep

Relax, Turn Off Your Phone, And Go To Sleep

Apps Health Life Tech

Our devices are a gift that connect us to so many people and so much information, but they do not have to raise our anxiety and harm our all-important sleep. We need to control our devices, rather than letting them control us.

Pressure Doesn’t Have To Turn Into Stress

Pressure Doesn’t Have To Turn Into Stress

Health Life

The process starts with understanding that stress is caused not by other people or external events, but by your reactions to them. In the workplace, many people blame their high anxiety levels on a boss, job, deadlines, or competing commitments for their time. But peers who face the same challenges do so without stress.

The Canadian Genius Who Created Modern AI

The Canadian Genius Who Created Modern AI

Science Tech Videos

For nearly 40 years, Geoff Hinton has been trying to get computers to learn like people do, a quest almost everyone thought was crazy or at least hopeless – right up until the moment it revolutionized the field. In this video, Bloomberg Businessweek’s Ashlee Vance meets the Godfather of AI.

How NASA Are Going Back To The Moon

How NASA Are Going Back To The Moon

Explainers Science Tech Videos

While Apollo placed the first steps on the Moon, Artemis opens the door for humanity to sustainably work and live on another world for the first time. Using the lunar surface as a proving ground for living on Mars, this next chapter in exploration will forever establish our presence in the stars.

Is Aging A Disease?

Is Aging A Disease?

Health Life

Over the years, the movement to classify aging as a disease has gained momentum not only from longevity enthusiasts but also from scientists. Whether aging can be cured or not, there are arguments for thinking about it like a disease. But there are major pitfalls, too.

“AlphaGo”, Artificial Intelligence Taking On The Chinese Game Go

“AlphaGo”, Artificial Intelligence Taking On The Chinese Game Go

Science Tech Videos

With more board configurations than there are atoms in the universe, the ancient Chinese game of Go has long been considered a grand challenge for artificial intelligence. On March 9, 2016, the worlds of Go and artificial intelligence collided in South Korea for an extraordinary best-of-five-game competition, coined The DeepMind Challenge Match.

Behind The Scenes Of A Radical New Cancer Cure

Behind The Scenes Of A Radical New Cancer Cure

Health Long Reads Science

CAR-T involves removing a patient’s own blood, filtering for immune cells called T-cells, and genetically engineering those cells to recognize and attack cancer. CAR-T made history in 2017 as the first FDA-approved gene therapy to treat any disease. The trials that led to approval showed response rates of 80 percent and above in aggressive leukemias and lymphomas that had resisted chemotherapy.

A Banana Grown At Subzero Temps Also Has An Edible Peel

A Banana Grown At Subzero Temps Also Has An Edible Peel

Food Innovation Nature Science

A Japanese farm introduced a new crop this winter: an organic banana with a peel that’s thin enough to eat. In a nod to this appealing outer covering, Setsuzo Tanaka, the banana’s inventor, has named his creation the Mongee (“mon-gay”) banana — which means “incredible banana” in Japanese.

The Way We Work Is Killing Us

The Way We Work Is Killing Us

Business Health Life Psychology

In the United States, workers work among the longest, most extreme, and most irregular hours; have no guarantee to paid sick days, paid vacation, or paid family leave; and pay more for health insurance, yet are sicker and more stressed out than workers in other advanced economies.

Retiring Retirement

Retiring Retirement

Health Life

We’re going to see something we’ve never seen before—people in their 60s, 70s and 80s functioning at an exceptionally high level who want to continue working and remain connected. The question is whether society will adapt to make the most of this new labor pool.

Mommy Can’t Talk Right Now — She’s Dopamine Fasting

Mommy Can’t Talk Right Now — She’s Dopamine Fasting

Health Life Psychology

In Silicon Valley, there is a newish craze called dopamine fasting. What you must do is disconnect — take stock. Not look at your phone, not drink celery juice in your co-working kitchen, not hike, not touch, and not walk on busy streets. Attempt to prevent the activation of any dopamine at all and do deep thinking instead.

3D Printing Ink May Solve The “Toothpaste Problem”

3D Printing Ink May Solve The “Toothpaste Problem”

Innovation Science

A new kind of ink for 3D printing liquifies when pressed through the nozzle of a 3D printer, but then quickly returns to its original shape, researchers report. The invention paves the way for personalized biomaterial implants, according to new research. As things stand, however, personalized implants remain a long way off.

The Class Of 2000 ‘Could Have Been Anything’

The Class Of 2000 ‘Could Have Been Anything’

Health Life Long Reads

The Minford High School Class of 2000, in rural Minford, Ohio, began its freshman year as a typical class. Over the next decade, Scioto County would become ground zero in the state’s fight against opioids. It would lead Ohio with its rates of fatal drug overdoses, drug-related incarcerations and babies born with neonatal abstinence syndrome.

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