'It's Been Hell': Inside The Town Where Trumpers Are Building A Private Wall • Discoverology

‘It’s Been Hell’: Inside The Town Where Trumpers Are Building A Private Wall

vice.com
15m read

Either as a demonstration of loyalty to the president or, in the case of one developer, a bid for lucrative government contracts, some private citizens are furiously erecting their own barriers along the Southwest border. The latest iteration, the three-and-a-half-mile Rio Grande Valley wall, is now nearly complete.

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