Is Our Brain Hard-Wired To Be Optimistic? • Discoverology

Is Our Brain Hard-Wired To Be Optimistic?

Psychology, Science

Psychologists have found that 80% of people have, what they define as an optimism bias and that’s regardless of whether they believe themselves to be more pessimistic or realistic. The optimism bias is our tendency to underestimate the likelihood of negative events and overestimating the likelihood of positive events.

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