Into The Unknown • Discoverology

Into The Unknown

History, Nature

It was December 14, 1912. Thirty years old, already a seasoned explorer, Douglas Mawson was the leader of the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE), a 31-man team pursuing the most ambitious exploration yet of the southern continent. What followed was one of the most terrifying survival stories of all time.

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Crime, History

It was more than 2,000 years before the #MeToo movement, but a scene similar to the ones we’ve witnessed so often lately was already playing out. A prominent politician was on trial for corruption and bribery, charges bolstered by dirt his enemies had dug up from his past: the violent sexual assault of a young girl.

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History, Videos, World

In 1968, Albanian Communist dictator Enver Hoxha did what any leader espousing equality among all people would naturally do. He demanded his name be written into a mountain. It was a birthday present that he was giving himself.

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Nature, Videos, World

In 1986, the city of Aksu in China’s Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region began an ambitious tree-planting project that looked to turn swaths of desert into forest. The result was over 13 million acres of green that became the Kekeya greening project.

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History, Long Reads

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Business, Nature, Videos

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Long Reads, Nature

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Innovation, Nature, Tech

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Cities, History, Photos

The first thing that strikes anyone who regularly rides on the London Underground is how clean it looks in Mike Goldwater’s photographs. Homeward bound tourists keen to recapture the thrill of minding the gap and cooling their heels on overcrowded platforms are not offered a range of signature scents.

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History, Long Reads

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Food, Long Reads, Nature

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History, Long Reads, Politics

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Long Reads, Nature

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Nature, Science, Tech, Videos

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Air Co’s Vodka Is Made Out Of Carbon Dioxide Pulled From The Atmosphere

Food, Innovation, Nature

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History, Videos, World

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