Inside The Strange World Of Kidnap And Ransom Survival Schools • Discoverology

Inside The Strange World Of Kidnap And Ransom Survival Schools

Crime, Long Reads

Risks Inc. is one of a few dozen private companies I had found that offer kidnap prevention and survival courses. Costs range from about $600 to a couple thousand dollars. Some are entirely in a classroom; others include role-playing.

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