Inside The Bizarre Subculture That Lives To Explore Chernobyl’s Dead Zone • Discoverology

Inside The Bizarre Subculture That Lives To Explore Chernobyl’s Dead Zone

As the first generation of Ukrainians born after the Chernobyl tragedy comes of age, a small subculture of them is now doing the unthinkable: defying government prohibitions and illegally entering the highly radioactive Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, or “Dead Zone”—for fun.

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