In San Francisco, Tech Money Doesn’t Buy Happiness • Discoverology

In San Francisco, Tech Money Doesn’t Buy Happiness

In the midst of a housing crisis, an injection of cash into the superheated real-estate market seems likely to cause an uptick in evictions and displacement.

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