In Japan, Repairing Buildings Without A Single Nail • Discoverology

In Japan, Repairing Buildings Without A Single Nail

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In the past, making and developing metal was too costly for carpenters in Japan. So instead of using nails, carpenters called “miyadaiku” developed unique methods for interlocking pieces of wood together, similar to a giant 3D puzzle.

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