I Fled Yugoslavia In 1941. Then I Returned to Join the Resistance. • Discoverology

I Fled Yugoslavia In 1941. Then I Returned to Join the Resistance.

Crime, History

After the Germans consolidated in northwestern Yugoslavia, I left New York for London, crushed by the news of what was going on. I told my parents I was returning to Yugoslavia to become a freedom fighter.

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