How Vacation Became Just Another Thing We’re Working On • Discoverology

How Vacation Became Just Another Thing We’re Working On

Business, Long Reads

Something’s up with retreats. Isn’t this supposed to be the age of burnout? Don’t people deny themselves vacation days and spend all their leisure time working on their side-hustles? How are retreats so popular when regular, no-frills relaxation is elusive for so many people? Maybe retreats are the future of vacations.

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