How The Government Came To Decide The Color Of Your Food • Discoverology

How The Government Came To Decide The Color Of Your Food

Tomatoes are red, margarine is yellow, and oranges, are, well, orange. We expect certain foods to be in certain colors. What we don’t realize is that these colors are not necessarily a product of nature but rather of historical controversies and deliberate decisions by various actors—including the government.

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