How The English Language Is Taking Over the Planet • Discoverology

How The English Language Is Taking Over the Planet

Long Reads, World

English is everywhere, and everywhere, English dominates. From inauspicious beginnings on the edge of a minor European archipelago, it has grown to vast size and astonishing influence. Almost 400m people speak it as their first language; a billion more know it as a secondary tongue. Is there any point in resisting?

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