How Ring Went From ‘Shark Tank’ Reject To America’s Scariest Surveillance Company • Discoverology

How Ring Went From ‘Shark Tank’ Reject To America’s Scariest Surveillance Company

vice.com
28m read

Amazon’s Ring started from humble roots as a smart doorbell company called “DoorBot.” Now it’s surveilling the suburbs and partnering with police. Although there’s no credible evidence that Ring actually deters or reduces crime, claiming that its products achieve these things is essential to its marketing model.

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