How Poor Americans Get Exploited By Their Landlords • Discoverology

How Poor Americans Get Exploited By Their Landlords

It is a mistake to see slums as a byproduct of the modern city, rundown areas that occur by accident. Instead, researchers contend that the slum has long been a “prime moneymaker” for those who profit from land scarcity, racial segregation, and deferred maintenance.

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