How One American Citizen Was Forcibly Drafted Into The South Korean Army • Discoverology

How One American Citizen Was Forcibly Drafted Into The South Korean Army

Illinois-born Young Chun thought a stint teaching English in Korea would be a quick and easy way to pay off his mounting post-college debt. He could not have been more wrong. Chun became a victim of a collision between unforgiving bureaucracy and the meddling of an unknown family member thousands of miles away.

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