How Much The Public Knows About Science, And Why It Matters • Discoverology

How Much The Public Knows About Science, And Why It Matters

A survey finds striking differences in levels of science knowledge by education and by race and ethnicity. About half of whites (48 percent) score high; by comparison, much smaller shares of Hispanics (23 percent) and blacks (9 percent) correctly answer at least nine of the questions.

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