How McKinsey Destroyed The Middle Class • Discoverology

How McKinsey Destroyed The Middle Class

Consultants seek to legitimate both the job cuts and the explosion of elite pay. Rather than simply improving management, to make American corporations lean and fit, they fostered hierarchy, making management, in David Gordon’s memorable phrase, “fat and mean.”

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