How Leonardo Da Vinci Made A "Satellite" Map In 1502 • Discoverology

How Leonardo Da Vinci Made A “Satellite” Map In 1502

Art, History, Videos

When infamous Italian politician Cesare Borgia brought Leonardo da Vinci — the guy who drew this portrait — to the city of Imola, it was as a military engineer. When Leonardo was installed at Borgia’s newly acquired fort, one of his duties was to help Borgia learn the territory.

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Media, Videos

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History, Photos

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Crime, History

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Crime, History, Long Reads

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History

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Explainers, Tech, Videos

You’ve seen the pop-ups: “This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Please accept cookies.” Without cookies, the online world we know today couldn’t exist. But that world relies on advertising, which gives three kinds of companies a strong incentive to track your online behavior.

We use cookies on this website to analyse your use of our products and services, provide content from third parties and assist with our marketing efforts. Learn more about our use of cookies and available controls: cookie policy. Please be aware that your experience may be disrupted until you accept cookies.