How Lego Became The Apple Of Toys • Discoverology

How Lego Became The Apple Of Toys

Business, Explainers, Long Reads, Tech

In the last 10 years, Lego has grown into nothing less than the Apple of toys: a profit-generating, design-driven miracle built around premium, intuitive, highly covetable hardware that fans can’t get enough of. An exclusive look inside the company’s top-secret Future Lab.

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