How Do Airlines Price Tickets? • Discoverology

How Do Airlines Price Tickets?

Economics, Explainers, Videos

To the average buyer, airline ticket prices appear to fluctuate without reason. But behind the process is actually the science of dynamic pricing, which has less to do with cost and more to do with artificial intelligence.

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Steeped in strange symbology, the breath-taking ‘inverted tower’, or initiation well, found at the heart of Sintra’s Quinta da Regaleira celebrates Portugal’s unique historical connection to the mysterious and enigmatic Knights Templar.

The Violent Eviction That Transformed San Francisco

The Violent Eviction That Transformed San Francisco

History, Videos

In 1968, a group of predominantly Filipino elders in San Francisco launched a battle to protect their home from eviction. Their fight for their neighborhood would evolve into a nearly decade-long protest with thousands of supporters and become a symbol of the campaign for affordable housing for decades to come.

How Designers Engineer Luck Into Video Games

How Designers Engineer Luck Into Video Games

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Fairness is the unspoken promise of most video games. Controlled by an omniscient and omnipotent designer, a video game has the capacity to be ultimately just, and players expect that it will be so. And yet, when video games truly play by the rules, the player can feel cheated.

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Food, Innovation, Videos

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The Death And Afterlife Of The Mall

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Architecture, Cities, Videos

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Ramzan Kadyrov: Brutal Tyrant, Instagram Star

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Apps, Politics, Videos

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Videos

Natalie Portman and Jason Schwartzman are lovers who reunite in a Paris hotel room, in Wes Anderson’s 2007 prelude to The Darjeeling Limited. All cunningly soundtracked by Peter Sarstedt’s 1969 hit, “Where Do You Go To (My Lovely)?”

Silicon Valley’s Online Slave Market

Silicon Valley’s Online Slave Market

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At the center of this powerful investigative film is Fatou, a 16 year old in Kuwait City who has been there for nine months. We follow her rescue and journey back home to Guinea, West Africa and ask: what’s being done to control the apps promoted on Google, Apple and Facebook-owned Instagram?

Four Japanese Rules To Live Past 100

Four Japanese Rules To Live Past 100

Life, Videos

Okinawa, long known as the island of the immortals, is home to the highest concentration of centenarians in Japan. The village of Kitanakagusuku ranks first in Japanese women’s longevity. What is it about this island that makes its inhabitants live a longer and happier life?

How You End Up In And Survive A Cult

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How do well-meaning, intelligent people end up in a cult? EnlightenNext was an organization, founded by self-styled guru Andrew Cohen, that aimed to facilitate spiritual awakening. Cohen’s most devoted students meditated for hours—at times, months—on end, were often celibate, and lived together.

The Internet’s Second Revolution

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The second half of humanity is joining the internet. People in countries like India will change the internet, and it will change them. You have a whole bunch of languages that don’t enjoy very good support in terms of web browsers or input. And you have a whole bunch of people who can’t actually read or write.

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Who on Earth is handed a worse fate than toys and figurines? They are made to be controlled, with zero chance of gaining basic rights. Without a chance to speak unless a string is pulled or a button pushed, who will carry their voice for them? “Framed” tells the story of a clay pawn in a human’s game.

World’s First City Discovered By U.S. Spy Satellite

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History, Videos, World

Old U.S. spy satellite images of the Middle East have unearthed a stunning discovery: the world’s first city, Tell Brak – 4,000 years older than the Great Pyramids. Where Tell Brak lies is an area of the Middle East known as the Fertile Crescent.

Living Off The Grid In Paradise

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Videos, World

Warrick Mitchell lives deep in one of the world’s most remote locations: Fiordland, New Zealand. His home in the country’s oldest national park is nestled in a vast wildness accessible only by boat or airplane, a four day’s walk from the nearest road.

The Lie That Helped Build Nintendo

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Business, History, Tech, Videos

In 1981, a young Swede called Owe Bergsten strolled through Singapore to pass the time before his flight home. Passing a camera shop, he spotted a two-button LCD game called ‘Fire RC-04’ in the window. The story of a man, a lie, a video game handheld, and a business empire.

How Norway Designed A More Humane Prison

How Norway Designed A More Humane Prison

Architecture, Crime, Videos

Halden Prison in Norway looks sort of like a fancy dorm room or a hotel — much different than the barbed wire and cramped cells we often associate with prison design. Its look is all part of a plan to create a more humane prison, one where the architecture isn’t part of the punishment.

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