How An Obsession With Home Ownership Can Ruin The Economy • Discoverology

How An Obsession With Home Ownership Can Ruin The Economy

Many dream of owning their own home, and thanks to huge financial incentives in the rich world many have been able to so. But government policies to encourage home ownership were a huge mistake.

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