Best History Articles & Videos on the internet • Discoverology

History

Read the best history articles from around the internet, or watch the most insightful history videos from platforms like Youtube, Vimeo or leading history publishers like The New York Times, The Atlantic, Vanity Fair, New Yorker and many more.

100 Years Ago In Photos: A Look Back At 1919

100 Years Ago In Photos: A Look Back At 1919

History, Photos

A century ago, the Treaty of Versailles was signed, as much of the world was still recovering from the devastation of World War I. Rebuilding was just beginning, refugees were returning home, orphans were being cared for, and a global influenza outbreak was being battled.

In A Disaster, Humans Can Behave… Pretty Well, Actually

In A Disaster, Humans Can Behave… Pretty Well, Actually

History, Life

In his new book, Jon Mooallem tells the story of the Great Alaska Earthquake and Genie Chance, the woman whose voice on the radio held everyone together. It’s a beautiful exploration of how people tell stories on the radio, on stage, in books, and generally to each other.

How Iran Threw The World's Greatest Party In A Desert

How Iran Threw The World's Greatest Party In A Desert

History, Videos

In 1971, Iran threw an extravagant and exclusive party to commemorate the 2500th anniversary of the Persian empire. The party had a grandeur never seen before in the world’s recorded history. It proved to be a stepping stone for the rise of the Iranian revolution and the fall of the Iranian Monarchy that changed the country forever.

World's First City Discovered By U.S. Spy Satellite

World's First City Discovered By U.S. Spy Satellite

History, Videos, World

Old U.S. spy satellite images of the Middle East have unearthed a stunning discovery: the world’s first city, Tell Brak – 4,000 years older than the Great Pyramids. Where Tell Brak lies is an area of the Middle East known as the Fertile Crescent.

When The Sahara Was Green

When The Sahara Was Green

History, Nature, Videos, World

The climate of the Sahara was completely different thousands of years ago. And we’re not talking about just a few years of extra rain. We’re talking about a climate that was so wet for so long that animals and humans alike made themselves at home in the middle of the Sahara.

Franck Bohbot

Inspiration
Franck Bohbot
The 1968 Sci-Fi That Spookily Predicted Today

The 1968 Sci-Fi That Spookily Predicted Today

History, Media

In John Brunner’s 1968 novel Stand on Zanzibar, for instance, he peers ahead to imagine life in 2010, correctly forecasting wearable technology, Viagra, video calls, same-sex marriage, the legalization of cannabis, and the proliferation of mass shootings.

The Bizarre Social History Of Beds

The Bizarre Social History Of Beds

History

Groucho Marx once joked, “Anything that can’t be done in bed isn’t worth doing at all.” You might think he was referring to sleeping and sex. But humans, at one time or another, have done just about everything in bed. And yet, they’re more of an afterthought.

The Beautiful Island Of San Serriffe, The Most Elaborate April Fool’s Joke Ever Printed

The Beautiful Island Of San Serriffe, The Most Elaborate April Fool’s Joke Ever Printed

Design, History, Media

The Guardian’s seven-page feature on the island of San Serriffe looked like any travel feature that newspapers were printing at the time. But not all was as it seemed. The feature was an elaborate April Fool’s Day joke. The island of San Serriffe did not exist and everything was completely fabricated.

The Long-Forgotten Vigilante Murders Of The San Luis Valley

The Long-Forgotten Vigilante Murders Of The San Luis Valley

Crime, History, Long Reads

For more than a century, historians, writers, and artists were guilty of creating a mythologized version of the American West. How history forgot Felipe and Vivián Espinosa, two of the American West’s most brutal killers—and the complicated story behind their murderous rampage.

When The iPhone Nearly Killed A Nation

When The iPhone Nearly Killed A Nation

History, Tech, Videos, World

Nokia dominated the first decade of the cellphone boom, becoming a beloved brand around the world and pumping billions of dollars into the Finnish economy. Then, along came Steve Jobs and his iPhone in 2007 and ruined everything. Tens of thousands of jobs were lost. Nokia sold its phone business to Microsoft. And Finns took a serious hit to their country pride.

In Search Of Russia's Lost Gold

In Search Of Russia's Lost Gold

History, World

Before World War I, Russia possessed the third-largest gold reserve in the world, bested only by the US and France. During the Russian Revolution, the Bolsheviks captured the entirety of Tsar Nicholas II’s family gold reserve – or so they thought.

The Rise And Fall Of Pan Am

The Rise And Fall Of Pan Am

Business, History, Videos

Pan Am was once the largest international airline in the US. In 1970 alone, it carried 11 million passengers to 86 countries worldwide. But after 60 years of flight, decades of financial turbulence, and a devastating terrorist attack above the skies of Lockerbie, Scotland, Pan Am went bust.

Who Owns South Africa?

Who Owns South Africa?

History, Life, Long Reads, Politics

The Glen Grey Act was the first piece of legislation to enshrine in law the residential separation of the races. It was also the basis for the notorious Natives Land Act of 1913, which in its final form allocated a mere thirteen percent of all arable land to the black majority. 

Austin Rossborough

Inspiration
Austin Rossborough
The Oddly Autocratic Roots Of Pad Thai

The Oddly Autocratic Roots Of Pad Thai

Food, History

In rice-centric Thailand, then known as Siam, the dish seemed more Chinese. But Thailand’s prime minister, who first rose to power as part of a military coup against the longtime monarchy, had spoken. As part of his strident nationalism, he wanted all Thais to eat pad Thai.

Revisiting An American Town Where Black People Weren’t Welcome After Dark

Revisiting An American Town Where Black People Weren’t Welcome After Dark

History, Life, Long Reads

Anna is a city of a little more than 4,000 people located in the middle of Union County, where soybean fields and flatlands to the north give way to the forests and sandstone canyons of southern Illinois. Most people I met, wish the racist lore behind the city’s name would go away. So why hasn’t it?

The Death Of The Hippies

The Death Of The Hippies

History, Life, Photos

Professional photographer Joe Samberg remembers how drugs destroyed Berkeley’s Telegraph Avenue scene. Still, the hippies did end up having a lasting impact on American culture—even if it wasn’t quite the one they’d intended.

The Dark History Of How Coffee Took Over The World

The Dark History Of How Coffee Took Over The World

Food, History

Four hundred years ago, Coffea arabica, a tropical shrub bearing glossy green leaves and bright-red berries, was virtually unknown outside of the Arab world and the corner of Ethiopia where it had been discovered in the ninth century.

Events That Changed The Course Of History, In Photos

Events That Changed The Course Of History, In Photos

History, Photos

Great documentary photography will capture turning points: moments that change the course of history on a global, national, or even personal level. The world’s best photographers pick out the most powerful images from their archives.

Did The Advent Of The First Desktop Computer Lead To Murder?

Did The Advent Of The First Desktop Computer Lead To Murder?

Crime, History, Tech

In the summer of 1965, the Olivetti P101 made it to the New York World’s Fair but only just. It was hidden away in a small room behind the main stand. If anyone found it, it was supposed to be an accident. But a few people did. Soon more and more began to squeeze their way in.

The Long-Lost Story Of The Longest Book Ever Written

The Long-Lost Story Of The Longest Book Ever Written

History, Long Reads

For or a long time, Joe Gould thought he was going blind. This was before he lost his teeth, and years before he lost the history of the world he’d been writing in hundreds of dime-store composition notebooks, their black covers mottled like the pelt of a speckled goat, their white pages lined with thin blue veins.

Nina Dodd

Inspiration
Nina Dodd
Post-War East Harlem Photographed By Leo Goldstein

Post-War East Harlem Photographed By Leo Goldstein

History, Photos

Leo Goldstein began capturing East Harlem in 1949 after he’d joined the New York Photo League, a photo club that originated around the beginning of the Great Depression. Having remained largely unseen for the last 70 years, his photographs are now the focus of a new book, East Harlem: The Postwar Years.

Muslims Of Early America

Muslims Of Early America

History, Long Reads

Muslims came to America more than a century before Protestants, and in great numbers. How was their history forgotten? Not just the language of Islam, but the religion itself likely arrived in America in 1492, more than 20 years before Martin Luther nailed his theses to the door, igniting the Protestant reformation.

Stunning Photographs Of A Pre-Fame Prince In 1977

Stunning Photographs Of A Pre-Fame Prince In 1977

History, Photos

In 1977 the photographer Robert Whitman was asked to take some promo shots of an unknown 19-year-old musician called Prince Rogers Nelson. Over a couple of days, he shot the 19-year-old musician all over Minneapolis. Whitman was the first professional photographer ever to shoot Prince.

The Long-Forgotten Flight That Sent Boeing Off Course

The Long-Forgotten Flight That Sent Boeing Off Course

Business, History

It was May 2001. And Boeing’s leaders, CEO Phil Condit and President Harry Stonecipher, had decided it was time to put some distance between themselves and the people actually making the company’s planes. How much distance? This flight—a PR stunt to end the two-month contest for Boeing’s new headquarters—would reveal the answer.

'The Intelligence Coup Of The Century'

'The Intelligence Coup Of The Century'

Crime, History, Long Reads

For more than half a century, governments all over the world trusted a single company, Crypto AG, to keep the communications of their spies, soldiers and diplomats secret. But what none of its customers ever knew was that Crypto AG was secretly owned by the CIA.

Work, Protest And Play On The Streets Of Hackney

Work, Protest And Play On The Streets Of Hackney

History, Photos

During the 1970s and first half of the 80s photographer Neil Martinson recorded the lives of those who lived and worked in Hackney, east London. At that time, children still played in the street and on old bomb sites yet to be developed.

The History Of George Laurer And The Barcode

The History Of George Laurer And The Barcode

Business, History

A 67 cent packet of gum has ballooned into an enormous industry, and five billion barcodes are scanned each and every day. But how did we get to this point, and who was responsible for the UPC barcode?

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