Best History Articles & Videos on the internet • Discoverology

History

Read the best history articles from around the internet, or watch the most insightful history videos from platforms like Youtube, Vimeo or leading history publishers like The New York Times, The Atlantic, Vanity Fair, New Yorker and many more.

The World Through The Eyes Of The US

The World Through The Eyes Of The US

History Media World

There is always that one country on America’s collective conscious. After looking at 741,681 section front headlines of The New York Times, Russell Goldenberg found out which countries around the world have preoccupied Americans the most each month since 1900.

London Underground 1970-1980 By Mike Goldwater

London Underground 1970-1980 By Mike Goldwater

Cities History Photos

The first thing that strikes anyone who regularly rides on the London Underground is how clean it looks in Mike Goldwater’s photographs. Homeward bound tourists keen to recapture the thrill of minding the gap and cooling their heels on overcrowded platforms are not offered a range of signature scents.

"I Met The Walrus", An Animated Interview With John Lennon

"I Met The Walrus", An Animated Interview With John Lennon

Art History Videos

In 1969, a 14-year-old Beatle fanatic named Jerry Levitan snuck into John Lennon’s hotel room in Toronto and convinced him to do an interview. 38 years later, Levitan, director Josh Raskin and illustrators James Braithwaite and Alex Kurina have collaborated to create an animated short film.

100 Years Ago In Photos: A Look Back At 1919

100 Years Ago In Photos: A Look Back At 1919

History Photos

A century ago, the Treaty of Versailles was signed, as much of the world was still recovering from the devastation of World War I. Rebuilding was just beginning, refugees were returning home, orphans were being cared for, and a global influenza outbreak was being battled.

The Rise And Fall Of Facts

The Rise And Fall Of Facts

History Media Politics

Because fact-checking these days is primarily the domain of legacy print publications, it retains that sheen of legitimacy and seriousness. To fact check is to assure readers, writers, and editors that great care is being taken.

When The Sahara Was Green

When The Sahara Was Green

History Nature Videos World

The climate of the Sahara was completely different thousands of years ago. And we’re not talking about just a few years of extra rain. We’re talking about a climate that was so wet for so long that animals and humans alike made themselves at home in the middle of the Sahara.

Virginia Mori

Inspiration
Virginia Mori
The People Who Shaped The World Wide Web

The People Who Shaped The World Wide Web

History Long Reads Tech

Thirty years ago, the world wide web was a way for scientists to share data. Since then, it’s become a critical force for industry, and how the world connects. But this didn’t happen all at once. The web’s evolution has been shaped by the geography of its creators and users.

The Oddly Autocratic Roots Of Pad Thai

The Oddly Autocratic Roots Of Pad Thai

Food History

In rice-centric Thailand, then known as Siam, the dish seemed more Chinese. But Thailand’s prime minister, who first rose to power as part of a military coup against the longtime monarchy, had spoken. As part of his strident nationalism, he wanted all Thais to eat pad Thai.

The 1968 Sci-Fi That Spookily Predicted Today

The 1968 Sci-Fi That Spookily Predicted Today

History Media

In John Brunner’s 1968 novel Stand on Zanzibar, for instance, he peers ahead to imagine life in 2010, correctly forecasting wearable technology, Viagra, video calls, same-sex marriage, the legalization of cannabis, and the proliferation of mass shootings.

The Long-Forgotten Vigilante Murders Of The San Luis Valley

The Long-Forgotten Vigilante Murders Of The San Luis Valley

Crime History Long Reads

For more than a century, historians, writers, and artists were guilty of creating a mythologized version of the American West. How history forgot Felipe and Vivián Espinosa, two of the American West’s most brutal killers—and the complicated story behind their murderous rampage.

Snapshots of Manchester In The 1960s

Snapshots of Manchester In The 1960s

History Photos

A series of photos of Manchester in the 60s, including Piccadilly Gardens, Manchester Central Station, The Scala cinema on Wilmslow Road, Ringway (Manchester) Airport, the Church of the Holy Name, the Manchester City Art Gallery, Piccadilly Plaza, Mancunian Way, Mosley Street and more.

The Beautiful Island Of San Serriffe, The Most Elaborate April Fool’s Joke Ever Printed

The Beautiful Island Of San Serriffe, The Most Elaborate April Fool’s Joke Ever Printed

Design History Media

The Guardian’s seven-page feature on the island of San Serriffe looked like any travel feature that newspapers were printing at the time. But not all was as it seemed. The feature was an elaborate April Fool’s Day joke. The island of San Serriffe did not exist and everything was completely fabricated.

The Soviets’ Unbreakable Code

The Soviets’ Unbreakable Code

History Tech

Created at the end of World War II and introduced in 1956, the Fialka replaced the Albatross, a Soviet cipher machine that was itself more complex than the Enigma. By the 1970s, Fialka encryption machines had been widely adopted by Warsaw Pact and other communist nations, and they remained in use until the early 1990s.

Matt Rota

Inspiration
Matt Rota
'The Intelligence Coup Of The Century'

'The Intelligence Coup Of The Century'

Crime History Long Reads

For more than half a century, governments all over the world trusted a single company, Crypto AG, to keep the communications of their spies, soldiers and diplomats secret. But what none of its customers ever knew was that Crypto AG was secretly owned by the CIA.

'Bizarre As Hell': The Disappearance Of The Yuba County Five

'Bizarre As Hell': The Disappearance Of The Yuba County Five

Crime History

How five men came to be on an inhospitable mountain road more than 50 miles from their homes in and around Marysville and Yuba City, California, was just one of the mysteries surrounding their disappearance. All five had intellectual disabilities or psychiatric issues to various degrees.

The Long-Lost Story Of The Longest Book Ever Written

The Long-Lost Story Of The Longest Book Ever Written

History Long Reads

For or a long time, Joe Gould thought he was going blind. This was before he lost his teeth, and years before he lost the history of the world he’d been writing in hundreds of dime-store composition notebooks, their black covers mottled like the pelt of a speckled goat, their white pages lined with thin blue veins.

Events That Changed The Course Of History, In Photos

Events That Changed The Course Of History, In Photos

History Photos

Great documentary photography will capture turning points: moments that change the course of history on a global, national, or even personal level. The world’s best photographers pick out the most powerful images from their archives.

How We’ll Forget John Lennon

How We’ll Forget John Lennon

Explainers History Media Psychology

The report, “The universal decay of collective memory and attention,” concludes that people and things are kept alive through “oral communication” from about five to 30 years. They then pass into written and online records, where they experience a slower, longer decline.

1980s Teenagers And Their Bedroom Walls

1980s Teenagers And Their Bedroom Walls

History Photos

Desire, adoration, safety, identity and escape are all there on the teenager’s bedroom walls. In the 1980s, these teenagers were photographed in their bedrooms – the place where they go to dream.

Joseph Ford

Inspiration
Joseph Ford
Into The Unknown

Into The Unknown

History Nature

It was December 14, 1912. Thirty years old, already a seasoned explorer, Douglas Mawson was the leader of the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE), a 31-man team pursuing the most ambitious exploration yet of the southern continent. What followed was one of the most terrifying survival stories of all time.

The Illustrated History Of How Sugar Conquered The World

The Illustrated History Of How Sugar Conquered The World

Food History

If you want to understand Western history, you have to understand sugar. And vice versa. Because sugar’s not just something sweet: over the centuries it’s been a medicine, a spice, a symbol of royalty, and an instrument of disease, addiction, and oppression.

How Philadelphia Became The One And Only Cream Cheese

How Philadelphia Became The One And Only Cream Cheese

Business Food History

There is only one cream cheese, and that is the brick-shaped silver package with the bright blue lettering: Philadelphia. Philadelphia cream cheese’s dominance isn’t a happy accident. Its cult popularity is likely the result of equal parts clever marketing and good timing.

The Sexual Assault Case That Shook Ancient Rome

The Sexual Assault Case That Shook Ancient Rome

Crime History

It was more than 2,000 years before the #MeToo movement, but a scene similar to the ones we’ve witnessed so often lately was already playing out. A prominent politician was on trial for corruption and bribery, charges bolstered by dirt his enemies had dug up from his past: the violent sexual assault of a young girl.

A ‘Thrilling’ Mission To Get The Swedish To Change Overnight

A ‘Thrilling’ Mission To Get The Swedish To Change Overnight

History World

“Thrilling” is the word repeatedly used by Jan Ramqvist to describe how he felt about participating in a nationwide mission to get all Swedish motorists and cyclists to change the habits of a lifetime and begin driving on the right-hand side of the road for the first time.

The Deadliest Marksman’s Cold, Brave Stand

The Deadliest Marksman’s Cold, Brave Stand

Crime History

Eighty years ago, a freezing Finnish farm boy took aim at the unstoppable Red Army — and became the greatest sharpshooter the world has ever seen. Simo Häyhä compiled, by some accounts, a kill count in excess of 500 by sniper rifle, more than anyone in recorded history.

Work, Protest And Play On The Streets Of Hackney

Work, Protest And Play On The Streets Of Hackney

History Photos

During the 1970s and first half of the 80s photographer Neil Martinson recorded the lives of those who lived and worked in Hackney, east London. At that time, children still played in the street and on old bomb sites yet to be developed.

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