Gustave Eiffel's Secret Apartment In The Eiffel Tower • Discoverology

Gustave Eiffel’s Secret Apartment In The Eiffel Tower

Architecture, Cities

When the Eiffel Tower opened in 1889 to much wonder and acclaim, designer Gustave Eiffel soaked up the praise, but as if that wasn’t enough, it was soon revealed that he had built himself a small apartment near the top of the world wonder.

Related tags
Related posts
Why Do Countries Build New Capital Cities?

Why Do Countries Build New Capital Cities?

Cities, Videos

It doesn’t seem obvious why a government will want to move its capital from a major city to a place where almost nobody lives but a couple of dozen countries have done it since 1950. In every case, the government of these countries gave a certain rationale for their decision.

World’s Busiest Station: Shinjuku Station, Tokyo

World’s Busiest Station: Shinjuku Station, Tokyo

Cities, Videos, World

Five separate train lines, almost three thousand passengers per minute and trains arriving every second. How can the people behind the scenes of the world’s busiest station overcome a traffic load like this every day? A look behind the scenes of the world’s busiest station: Shinjuku Station in Tokyo.

The Impossible Architecture Of Dreams

The Impossible Architecture Of Dreams

Architecture, Art, Design, Innovation

Where do we go when we dream? This surreal territory has proved fertile ground for a new generation of contemporary artists working at the intersection of architecture, interior design, and technology. The dreamscapes of these creations offer an intriguing insight into a new movement in digital art.

The Golden Ratio: Design’s Biggest Myth

The Golden Ratio: Design’s Biggest Myth

Architecture, Design

In the world of art, architecture, and design, the golden ratio has earned a tremendous reputation. The Parthenon, the Pyramids at Giza, the paintings of Michelangelo, the Mona Lisa, even the Apple logo are all said to incorporate it. The golden ratio’s aesthetic bona fides are an urban legend, a myth, a design unicorn.

Design Schemes To Survive Climate Change

Design Schemes To Survive Climate Change

Architecture, Design, Innovation, Nature

A new generation of ­architects, designers, and experts is creating infrastructure and buildings that respond to both extreme conditions and ongoing stress. Here’s a look at some of the most ­innovative approaches to living in a ­increasingly apocalyptic world.

The Cost Of Keeping Singapore Squeaky Clean

The Cost Of Keeping Singapore Squeaky Clean

Cities, Economics, Nature

Founding father and first Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew kicked off the Keep Singapore Clean campaign 50 years ago. The aim wasn’t just to make the city more pleasant. A cleaner city, Lee Kuan Yew reasoned, would create a stronger economy.

The City Left Behind By China’s Nuclear Ambitions

The City Left Behind By China’s Nuclear Ambitions

Cities, Photos, World

Li Yang grew up in what he thought was a boring town. It was called 404, like the error code, and sat a couple hours from the nearest city, in the sun-beaten Gobi Desert of western China. It was once part of a massive nuclear weapons base in the People’s Republic of China.

Dressing For The Surveillance Age

Dressing For The Surveillance Age

Cities, Long Reads, Tech

As cities become ever more packed with cameras that always see, public anonymity could disappear. Can stealth streetwear evade electronic eyes? Is there anything fashion can do to counter the erosion of public anonymity?

Why Do So Many U.S. Cities Have Gridded Streets?

Why Do So Many U.S. Cities Have Gridded Streets?

Cities, Explainers, Videos

Many U.S. cities were founded with a street grid. Why? This video describes the historic factors that contributed to the adoption of a grid. This includes influential city designs from Versailles, London, Philadelphia, New York, Chicago, and Reno.

How Air Conditioning Created The Modern City

How Air Conditioning Created The Modern City

Cities, Economics, Nature

The shopping mall would have been inconceivable without air conditioning, as would the deep-plan and glass-walled office block, as would computer servers. The expansion of tract housing in postwar suburban America relied on affordable domestic air conditioning units.

We use cookies on this website to analyse your use of our products and services, provide content from third parties and assist with our marketing efforts. Learn more about our use of cookies and available controls: cookie policy. Please be aware that your experience may be disrupted until you accept cookies.