Fifty Years After The ‘Black 14’ Were Banished, Wyoming Football Reckons With The Past • Discoverology

Fifty Years After The ‘Black 14’ Were Banished, Wyoming Football Reckons With The Past

History

It had been nearly 50 years since the University of Wyoming banished 14 black players from its football team, but the decades-old dispute was all Tom Burman could think about as he guided his car across the grain-colored plains stretching from the Denver airport to campus.

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