Best Economics Articles & Videos on the internet • Discoverology

Economics

Read the best economics articles from around the internet, or watch the most insightful economics videos from platforms like Youtube, Vimeo or leading economics publishers like The Economist, Bloomberg, Quartz, Fortune and many more.

Why Do We Work So Hard?

Why Do We Work So Hard?

Business, Economics, Health, Long Reads

Work, in this context, means active, billable labour. But in reality, it rarely stops. It follows us home on our smartphones, tugging at us during an evening out or in the middle of our children’s bedtime routines. It becomes our lives if we are not careful. It becomes us.

The Economics Of Cruise Ships

The Economics Of Cruise Ships

Business, Economics, Explainers

For decades, cruise companies have gone to great lengths to bypass US employment laws, hiring foreign workers for less than $2/hour. They’ve sheltered themselves as foreign entities while simultaneously benefitting from US taxpayer-funded agencies and resources.

The Invention Of Money

The Invention Of Money

Business, Economics, History, Long Reads

When the Venetian merchant Marco Polo got to China, he saw many wonders. One of the things that astonished him most, however, was a new invention, implemented by Kublai Khan, a grandson of the great conqueror Genghis. It was paper money, introduced by Kublai in 1260.

How Do Airlines Price Tickets?

How Do Airlines Price Tickets?

Economics, Explainers, Videos

To the average buyer, airline ticket prices appear to fluctuate without reason. But behind the process is actually the science of dynamic pricing, which has less to do with cost and more to do with artificial intelligence.

The Great Wall Street Housing Grab

The Great Wall Street Housing Grab

Economics, Life, Long Reads

Wall Street’s latest real estate grab has ballooned to roughly $60 billion, representing hundreds of thousands of properties. In some communities, it has fundamentally altered housing ecosystems in ways we’re only now beginning to understand, fueling a housing recovery without a homeowner recovery.

The Decoy Effect: How You Are Influenced To Choose Without Really Knowing It

The Decoy Effect: How You Are Influenced To Choose Without Really Knowing It

Business, Economics

The decoy effect is defined as the phenomenon whereby consumers change their preference between two options when presented with a third option – the “decoy” – that is “asymmetrically dominated”. It is also referred to as the “attraction effect” or “asymmetric dominance effect”.

Mapping America's Stark Wage Inequality

Mapping America's Stark Wage Inequality

Cities, Economics, Politics

One of the most important economic stories of the past couple of decades is the rise of economic inequality in the United States and around the world. Since 1980, economists say, wage growth for the highest-paid workers has been roughly triple that for the lowest paid. In some cities, the disparity is wider.

Franck Bohbot

Inspiration
Franck Bohbot
Letting Slower Passengers Board Airplane First Really Is Faster, Study Finds

Letting Slower Passengers Board Airplane First Really Is Faster, Study Finds

Economics, Science

Commercial airlines often prioritize boarding for passengers traveling with small children, or for those who need extra assistance, before starting to board the faster passengers. It’s counter-intuitive, but it turns out that letting slower passengers board first actually results in a more efficient process.

The Case Against Boeing

The Case Against Boeing

Business, Economics, Long Reads

In the wake of the 737 MAX disasters, caused by a software feature, Boeing and regulators initially placed blame on the planes’ pilots. Since Samya Stumo’s death in a 737 MAX crash, her parents and her great-uncle, Ralph Nader, have devoted themselves to proving that the company put profit over safety.

The Productivity Paradox

The Productivity Paradox

Business, Economics, Tech

Higher productivity means the expectation of rising wages and abundant job opportunities. In a time of Facebook, smartphones, self-driving cars, and computers that can beat a person at just about any board game, how can the key economic measure of technological progress be so pathetic?

How Air Conditioning Created The Modern City

How Air Conditioning Created The Modern City

Cities, Economics, Nature

The shopping mall would have been inconceivable without air conditioning, as would the deep-plan and glass-walled office block, as would computer servers. The expansion of tract housing in postwar suburban America relied on affordable domestic air conditioning units.

How Oxford University Shaped Brexit — And Britain’s Next Prime Minister

How Oxford University Shaped Brexit — And Britain’s Next Prime Minister

Economics, Long Reads, Politics

You turn the pages of yellowing student newspapers from 30 years ago, and there they are, recognisably the same faces that dominate today’s British news. Boris Johnson running for Union president, Michael Gove winning debating contests, Jeremy Hunt holding together the faction-ridden Oxford University Conservative Association (OUCA).

Austin Rossborough

Inspiration
Austin Rossborough
Will Upzoning Neighborhoods Make Homes More Affordable?

Will Upzoning Neighborhoods Make Homes More Affordable?

Cities, Economics, Long Reads

Housing affordability is a growing issue in America, and there’s a battle over how to fix it happening on blocks across the country. Zoning—the rules that govern how cities use their land—is on the front line. Cities and states across the country are proposing new upzoning laws to combat the housing crisis. Will they work?

How The 0.001% Invest

How The 0.001% Invest

Business, Economics

Global finance is being transformed as billionaires get richer and cut out the middlemen by creating their own “family offices”, personal investment firms that roam global markets looking for opportunities.

How Texas Instruments Monopolized Math Class

How Texas Instruments Monopolized Math Class

Business, Economics, Tech

Some major textbooks feature illustrations of Texas Instruments–series calculators alongside the text, so students can use their Texas Instruments calculator with the lesson plan, emphasizing how deeply interwoven Texas Instruments remains with the educational hegemony.

Life Under The Algorithm

Life Under The Algorithm

Business, Economics, Life, Long Reads

Increase your output, get paid more. Wages go up with productivity. Until, it turns out, they don’t anymore. The unwinding of this agreement in recent decades, such that workers must continue to produce more without expecting it to show up in their pay stubs, has now been the subject of a good deal of discussion and debate.

The Price Of Dominionist Theology

The Price Of Dominionist Theology

Economics, Life, Long Reads

Because my father believed that debt was sinful, and believed God wanted him and my mom to have as many kids as possible, they were too broke to help me pay for college. Because of this anti-debt theology, I wasn’t allowed to take out student loans, and had to attend a really conservative Christian college because it was so cheap.

Millennials Don’t Stand A Chance

Millennials Don’t Stand A Chance

Economics, Life

Millennials entered the workforce during the worst downturn since the Great Depression. They are now entering their peak earning years in the midst of an economic cataclysm more severe than the Great Recession. They will be the first generation in modern American history to end up poorer than their parents.

The Birth-Tissue Profiteers

The Birth-Tissue Profiteers

Economics, Health

How well-meaning donations end up fuelling an unproven, virtually unregulated two-billion-dollar stem-cell industry. An industry has sprung up in which specialized clinics offer miracle remedies from poorly understood stem-cell products.

How Migration Could Make The World Richer

How Migration Could Make The World Richer

Economics, Videos

Many of the recent political shifts in the West—the election of Donald Trump, the rise of populism in Europe and Brexit—can be partially attributed to the fear of mass migration. Yet increasing migration is one of the quickest ways to make the world richer.

Nina Dodd

Inspiration
Nina Dodd
The Great American Tax Haven: Why The Super-Rich Love South Dakota

The Great American Tax Haven: Why The Super-Rich Love South Dakota

Business, Economics, Long Reads

Last year billionaire Sun Hongbin quietly transferred $4.5bn worth of shares in his Chinese real estate firm to a company on a street corner in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Thanks to its relish for deregulation, the state is fast becoming the most profitable place for the mega-wealthy to park their billions.

The Economy Of Italy, Has The Luck All Run Out?

The Economy Of Italy, Has The Luck All Run Out?

Economics, Explainers, Videos

Once the seat of the roman empire, it is now home to a surprisingly robust yet temperamental economy. The economy of Italy followed a path very similar to that of Germany’s all be it with a little more flamboyancy which has found them where they are today.

Use A 'Fake' Location To Get Cheaper Plane Tickets

Use A 'Fake' Location To Get Cheaper Plane Tickets

Economics, Explainers

I can’t explain airline pricing but I do know some plane tickets can be cheaper depending on where you buy them or, even better, where you appear to buy them from. This is all about leveraging foreign currencies and points-of-sale to your advantage.

How Chicken Became The Rich World’s Most Popular Meat

How Chicken Became The Rich World’s Most Popular Meat

Economics, Food

Humans gobble so many chickens that the birds now count for 23bn of the 30bn land animals living on farms. Chicken is cheap and delicious. Fans of cheap chicken have selective breeding to thank. Farmers have also benefited from the healthy reputation of chicken.

How America’s Biggest Theater Chains Are Exploiting Their Janitors

How America’s Biggest Theater Chains Are Exploiting Their Janitors

Art, Economics

The major chains — AMC, Regal Entertainment and Cinemark — no longer rely on teenage ushers to keep the floors from getting sticky. Instead, they have turned to a vast immigrant workforce, often hired through layers of subcontractors. That arrangement makes it almost impossible for janitors to make a living wage.

Why Bigger Planes Mean Cramped Quarters

Why Bigger Planes Mean Cramped Quarters

Business, Economics, Explainers

The current Boeing 737s, the world’s most flown craft, are all longer than the original by up to 45 feet. And yet, on the inside, we’re getting squeezed. That’s because more space doesn’t equal more space in Airline World. It equals more seats—and typically less room per person.

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