Dracula Bosses Erect Billboard That Comes To Life At Night • Discoverology

Dracula Bosses Erect Billboard That Comes To Life At Night

Design, Media, Videos

The BBC decided to give Dracula fans a fright with two billboards of the show that come to life at night. A shadow of the infamous vampire appears in the center of the advert, which looks as though it has been cast by a number of wooden stakes plunged into the advert.

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