Deep In The Ocean’s Trenches, The Legacy Of Nuclear Testing Lives • Discoverology

Deep In The Ocean’s Trenches, The Legacy Of Nuclear Testing Lives

Evidence of Cold War nuclear testing has made its way to the deepest reaches of the Pacific Ocean. The discovery of “bomb carbon” miles below the surface shows how deep human impact goes.

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