Confirmation Bias: Why You Make Terrible Life Choices • Discoverology

Confirmation Bias: Why You Make Terrible Life Choices

Life, Psychology

Confirmation bias is the human tendency to seek, interpret and remember information that confirms pre-existing beliefs. It is insidious. It affects every choice you make. Every. Single. Day. The things you choose to buy, your health, who you choose to marry, your career, your emotions, and your finances.

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